Leg- vs arm-cycling repeated sprints with blood flow restriction and systemic hypoxia.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_5F29216BD6E3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Leg- vs arm-cycling repeated sprints with blood flow restriction and systemic hypoxia.
Journal
European journal of applied physiology
Author(s)
Willis S.J., Borrani F., Millet G.P.
ISSN
1439-6327 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1439-6319
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
119
Number
8
Pages
1819-1828
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The aim was to compare changes in peripheral and cerebral oxygenation, as well as metabolic and performance responses during conditions of blood flow restriction (BFR, bilateral vascular occlusion at 0% vs. 45% of resting pulse elimination pressure) and systemic hypoxia (~ 400 m, F <sub>I</sub> O <sub>2</sub> 20.9% vs. ~ 3800 m normobaric hypoxia, F <sub>I</sub> O <sub>2</sub> 13.1 ± 0.1%) during repeated sprint tests to exhaustion (RST) between leg- and arm-cycling exercises.
Seven participants (26.6 ± 2.9 years old; 74.0 ± 13.1 kg; 1.76 ± 0.09 m) performed four sessions of RST (10-s maximal sprints with 20-s recovery until exhaustion) during both leg and arm cycling to measure power output and metabolic equivalents as well as oxygenation (near-infrared spectroscopy) of the muscle tissue and prefrontal cortex.
Mean power output was lower in arms than legs (316 ± 118 vs. 543 ± 127 W; p < 0.001) and there were no differences between conditions for a given limb. Arms demonstrated greater changes in concentration of deoxyhemoglobin (∆[HHb], - 9.1 ± 6.1 vs. - 6.5 ± 5.6 μm) and total hemoglobin concentration (∆[tHb], 15.0 ± 10.8 vs. 11.9 ± 7.9 μm), as well as the absolute maximum tissue saturation index (TSI, 62.0 ± 8.3 vs. 59.3 ± 8.1%) than legs, respectively (p < 0.001), demonstrating a greater capacity for oxygen extraction. Further, there were greater changes in tissue blood volume [tHb] during BFR only compared to all other conditions (p < 0.01 for all).
The combination of BFR and/or hypoxia led to increased changes in [HHb] and [tHb] likely due to greater vascular resistance, to which arms were more responsive than legs.
Keywords
Altitude, BFR, Blood volume, Occlusion, Perfusion pressure
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/06/2019 8:06
Last modification date
21/08/2019 6:34
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