The consistency of individual centrality across time and networks in wild vervet monkeys.

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_5EDE118E757B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The consistency of individual centrality across time and networks in wild vervet monkeys.
Journal
American journal of primatology
Author(s)
Canteloup C., Puga-Gonzalez I., Sueur C., van de Waal E.
ISSN
1098-2345 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0275-2565
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
83
Number
2
Pages
e23232
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Previous primate social network studies largely limited their focus to grooming and/or aggression networks, particularly among adult females. In addition, the consistency of individuals' network centrality across time and/or different networks has received little attention, despite this being critical for a global understanding of dynamic social structure. Here, we analyzed the grooming, aggression, and play social networks of a group of 26-28 wild vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus), including adults and juveniles, over two periods of 6 months. We collected data on grooming, play, and aggression using focal animal sampling with instantaneous recording and ad libitum sampling. We examined whether individuals' network centralities were consistent over the two periods and across networks, as well as the effect of age, sex, and dominance rank on three individual centrality metrics in each network and within each study period. We found that individuals were quite consistent in their network position from 1 year to the next despite changes in group composition. However, their network centralities were not correlated across networks, except for Strength and weighted Eigenvector centrality between grooming and aggression networks. We also found that in the aggression network, high-rankers showed the highest centrality in most network metrics (e.g., Degree, Strength, and Eigenvector centrality) and compared to males, females were most central in 2017 but not in 2018. In the grooming network, high-ranking females had the highest Eigenvector centrality, whereas in the play network, juvenile males had the highest Eigenvector centrality. Our findings corroborate previous findings on vervet monkeys. In addition, they show that individuals' network centralities may vary among networks and over time; thus highlighting the effect of sociodemographics and behaviors' functions on the group level dynamics of social behavior.
Keywords
Animal Science and Zoology, Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics, aggression, grooming, network consistency, play, primate
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
20/01/2021 11:53
Last modification date
17/02/2021 6:27
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