Alcohol drinking in never users of tobacco, cigarette smoking in never drinkers, and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_5E9F374375E5.P001 (165.64 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_5E9F374375E5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Alcohol drinking in never users of tobacco, cigarette smoking in never drinkers, and the risk of head and neck cancer: pooled analysis in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology Consortium
Journal
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
Author(s)
Hashibe Mia, Brennan Paul, Benhamou Simone, Castellsague Xavier, Chen Chu, Curado Maria Paula, Dal Maso Luigino, Daudt Alexander W., Fabianova Eleonora, Wunsch-Filho Victor, Franceschi Silvia, Hayes Richard B., Herrero Rolando, Koifman Sergio, La Vecchia Carlo, Lazarus Philip, Levi Fabio, Mates Dana, Matos Elena, Menezes Ana, Muscat Joshua, Eluf-Neto Jose, Olshan Andrew F., Rudnai Peter, Schwartz Stephen M., Smith Elaine, Sturgis Erich M., Szeszenia-Dabrowska Neonilia, Talamini Renato, Wei Qingyi, Winn Deborah M., Zaridze David G., Zatonski Witold A., Zhang Zuo-Feng, Berthiller Julien, Boffetta Paolo
ISSN
0027-8874
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
99
Number
10
Pages
777-789
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: At least 75% of head and neck cancers are attributable to a combination of cigarette smoking and alcohol drinking. A precise understanding of the independent association of each of these factors in the absence of the other with the risk of head and neck cancer is needed to elucidate mechanisms of head and neck carcinogenesis and to assess the efficacy of interventions aimed at controlling either risk factor. METHODS: We examined the extent to which head and neck cancer is associated with cigarette smoking among never drinkers and with alcohol drinking among never users of tobacco. We pooled individual-level data from 15 case-control studies that included 10,244 head and neck cancer case subjects and 15,227 control subjects, of whom 1072 case subjects and 5775 control subjects were never users of tobacco and 1598 case subjects and 4051 control subjects were never drinkers of alcohol. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Among never drinkers, cigarette smoking was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR for ever versus never smoking = 2.13, 95% CI = 1.52 to 2.98), and there were clear dose-response relationships for the frequency, duration, and number of pack-years of cigarette smoking. Approximately 24% (95% CI = 16% to 31%) of head and neck cancer cases among nondrinkers in this study would have been prevented if these individuals had not smoked cigarettes. Among never users of tobacco, alcohol consumption was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer only when alcohol was consumed at high frequency (OR for three or more drinks per day versus never drinking = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.29 to 3.21). The association with high-frequency alcohol intake was limited to cancers of the oropharynx/hypopharynx and larynx. CONCLUSIONS: Our results represent the most precise estimates available of the independent association of each of the two main risk factors of head and neck cancer, and they exemplify the strengths of large-scale consortia in cancer epidemiology.
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Smoking
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/02/2008 11:16
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:09
Usage data