Participation in a population-based physical activity programme as an aid for smoking cessation: a randomised trial.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_5E6D2C57D511
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Participation in a population-based physical activity programme as an aid for smoking cessation: a randomised trial.
Journal
Tobacco Control
Author(s)
Bize R., Willi C., Chiolero A., Stoianov R., Payot S., Locatelli I., Cornuz J.
ISSN
1468-3318 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0964-4563
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
19
Number
6
Pages
488-494
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Exercise combined with nicotine therapy may help smoking cessation and minimise weight gain after quitting. Low participation in vigorous-intensity physical activity programmes precludes their population-wide applicability. In a randomised controlled trial, we tested whether a population-based moderate-intensity physical activity programme increases quit rates among sedentary smokers receiving nicotine therapy.
METHODS: Participants (n=481; 57% male; mean age, 42.2 years (SD 10.1); mean cigarette consumption, 27 (SD 10.2) per day) were offered a nine-week smoking cessation programme consisting of a weekly 15-minute counselling session and the prescription of nicotine replacement therapy. In addition, participants in the physical activity group (n=229) also took part in a programme of moderate-intensity physical activity implemented at the national level, and offering nine weekly 60-minute sessions of physical activity. To ensure equal contact conditions, participants in the control group (n=252) attended weekly 60-minute health behaviour education sessions unrelated to physical activity. The primary outcome was continuous CO-verified smoking abstinence rates at 1-year follow-up.
RESULTS: Continuous smoking abstinence rates were high and similar in the physical activity group and the control group at the end of the intervention (47% versus 46%, p=0.81) and at 1-year follow-up (27% versus 29%, p=0.71). The mean weight gain after one year was 4.4 kg and 6.2 kg among sustained quitters of the physical activity and control groups, respectively (p=0.06).
CONCLUSION: Participation in a population-based moderate-intensity physical activity programme for 9 weeks in addition to a comprehensive smoking cessation programme did not significantly increase smoking cessation rates. A non-significant reduction in weight gain was observed among participants who quit smoking in the physical activity group.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov; US National Institutes for Health (available online at http://clinicaltrials.gov/;
CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT00521391).
Keywords
Adult, Carbon Monoxide/analysis, Combined Modality Therapy, Counseling, Exercise, Female, Health Education, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nicotine/therapeutic use, Smoking Cessation/methods, Smoking Cessation/statistics & numerical data, Weight Gain
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/12/2010 16:09
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:16
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