Clusters of Sexual Behavior in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Men Who Have Sex With Men Reveal Highly Dissimilar Time Trends.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_5BE78DDA1CF4
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Clusters of Sexual Behavior in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-positive Men Who Have Sex With Men Reveal Highly Dissimilar Time Trends.
Journal
Clinical infectious diseases
Author(s)
Salazar-Vizcaya L., Kusejko K., Schmidt A.J., Carrillo-Montoya G., Nicca D., Wandeler G., Braun D.L., Fehr J., Darling KEA, Bernasconi E., Schmid P., Günthard H.F., Kouyos R.D., Rauch A.
ISSN
1537-6591 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1058-4838
Publication state
Published
Issued date
16/01/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Number
3
Pages
416-424
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Separately addressing specific groups of people who share patterns of behavioral change might increase the impact of behavioral interventions to prevent transmission of sexually transmitted infections. We propose a method based on machine learning to assist the identification of such groups among men who have sex with men (MSM).
By means of unsupervised learning, we inferred "behavioral clusters" based on the recognition of similarities and differences in longitudinal patterns of condomless anal intercourse with nonsteady partners (nsCAI) in the HIV Cohort Study over the last 18 years. We then used supervised learning to investigate whether sociodemographic variables could predict cluster membership.
We identified 4 behavioral clusters. The largest behavioral cluster (cluster 1) contained 53% of the study population and displayed the most stable behavior. Cluster 3 (17% of the study population) displayed consistently increasing nsCAI. Sociodemographic variables were predictive for both of these clusters. The other 2 clusters displayed more drastic changes: nsCAI frequency in cluster 2 (20% of the study population) was initially similar to that in cluster 3 but accelerated in 2010. Cluster 4 (10% of the study population) had significantly lower estimates of nsCAI than all other clusters until 2017, when it increased drastically, reaching 85% by the end of the study period.
We identified highly dissimilar behavioral patterns across behavioral clusters, including drastic, atypical changes. The patterns suggest that the overall increase in the frequency of nsCAI is largely attributable to 2 clusters, accounting for a third of the population.
Keywords
HIV, STI, clusters, condom, men who have sex with men, sexual behaviour, sexual behavior
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
10/04/2019 16:55
Last modification date
14/03/2020 7:08
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