Genomic basis of insularity and ecological divergence in barn owls (Tyto alba) of the Canary Islands.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_5BDEC1710361
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Genomic basis of insularity and ecological divergence in barn owls (Tyto alba) of the Canary Islands.
Journal
Heredity
Author(s)
Cumer T., Machado A.P., Siverio F., Cherkaoui S.I., Roque I., Lourenço R., Charter M., Roulin A., Goudet J.
ISSN
1365-2540 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0018-067X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
29/09/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
129
Pages
281-294
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Islands, and the particular organisms that populate them, have long fascinated biologists. Due to their isolation, islands offer unique opportunities to study the effect of neutral and adaptive mechanisms in determining genomic and phenotypical divergence. In the Canary Islands, an archipelago rich in endemics, the barn owl (Tyto alba), present in all the islands, is thought to have diverged into a subspecies (T. a. gracilirostris) on the eastern ones, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote. Taking advantage of 40 whole-genomes and modern population genomics tools, we provide the first look at the origin and genetic makeup of barn owls of this archipelago. We show that the Canaries hold diverse, long-standing and monophyletic populations with a neat distinction of gene pools from the different islands. Using a new method, less sensitive to structure than classical F <sub>ST</sub> , to detect regions involved in local adaptation to insular environments, we identified a haplotype-like region likely under selection in all Canaries individuals and genes in this region suggest morphological adaptations to insularity. In the eastern islands, where the subspecies is present, genomic traces of selection pinpoint signs of adapted body proportions and blood pressure, consistent with the smaller size of this population living in a hot arid climate. In turn, genomic regions under selection in the western barn owls from Tenerife showed an enrichment in genes linked to hypoxia, a potential response to inhabiting a small island with a marked altitudinal gradient. Our results illustrate the interplay of neutral and adaptive forces in shaping divergence and early onset speciation.
Keywords
Genetics (clinical), Genetics
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / 31003A_173178
Swiss National Science Foundation / 31003A-138180
Swiss National Science Foundation / 31003A_179358
Create date
29/09/2022 15:16
Last modification date
28/01/2023 6:47
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