Medication adherence and persistence as the cornerstone of effective antihypertensive therapy

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_5A66ED69F521
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Medication adherence and persistence as the cornerstone of effective antihypertensive therapy
Journal
American Journal of Hypertension
Author(s)
Burnier  M.
ISSN
0895-7061 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2006
Volume
19
Number
11
Pages
1190-6
Notes
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review --- Old month value: Nov
Abstract
Achieving optimal outcomes in the treatment of hypertension--a prevalent and largely asymptomatic disease--necessitates that patients take their medications not only properly (medication adherence) but also continue to do so throughout long-term treatment (persistence). However, poor medication-taking behavior is a major problem among patients with hypertension, and has been identified as one of the main causes of failure to achieve adequate control of blood pressure (BP). In turn, patients with hypertension who have uncontrolled BP as a result of their poor medication-taking behavior remain at risk for serious morbidity and mortality (eg, stroke, myocardial infarction, and kidney failure), thereby accounting for a significant cost burden through avoidable hospital admissions, premature deaths, work absenteeism, and reduced productivity. Improving medication-taking behavior during antihypertensive therapy therefore represents an important potential source of health and economic improvement. Whereas many factors may contribute to poor medication-taking behavior, the complexity of dosage regimens and the side effect profiles of drugs probably have the greatest therapy-related influence. Central to any strategy aimed at improving outcomes for patients with hypertension, therefore, are efficacious antihypertensive agents that facilitate good medication-taking behavior through simplified dosing and placebo-like tolerability, along with the development of programs to detect poor medication adherence and to support long-term medication persistence in daily practice.
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents/economics/*therapeutic use Chronic Disease/psychology Humans Hypertension/*drug therapy/prevention & control *Patient Compliance Physician-Patient Relations
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/01/2008 13:56
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:09
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