Correlates of social role and conflict severity in wild vervet monkey agonistic screams.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_59B3781E72E2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Correlates of social role and conflict severity in wild vervet monkey agonistic screams.
Journal
PloS one
Author(s)
Mercier S., Déaux E.C., van de Waal E., Bono AEJ, Zuberbühler K.
ISSN
1932-6203 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1932-6203
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
14
Number
5
Pages
e0214640
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Screams are acoustically distinct, high-pitched and high-amplitude calls, produced by many social species. Despite a wide range of production contexts, screams are characterised by an acoustic structure that appears to serve in altering the behaviour of targeted receivers during agonistic encounters. In chimpanzees, this can be achieved by callers producing acoustic variants that correlate with their identity, social role, relationship with the targeted recipient, the composition of the audience and the nature of the event. Although vervet monkeys (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) have been studied for decades, not much is known about their agonistic screams. Here, we examined agonistic screams produced by wild vervet monkeys to investigate the degree to which caller identity, social role and conflict severity affected call structure. We found that screams were both individually distinctive and dependent of the agonistic events. In particular, victim screams were longer and higher-pitched than aggressor screams, while screams produced in severe conflicts (chases, physical contact) had higher entropy than those in mild conflicts. We discuss these findings in terms of their evolutionary significance and suggest that acoustic variation might serve to reduce the aggression level of opponents, while simultaneously attracting potential helpers.
Keywords
Agonistic Behavior/physiology, Animals, Biological Evolution, Chlorocebus aethiops/physiology, Female, Male, Observer Variation, Social Behavior, Vocalization, Animal/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
27/05/2019 18:25
Last modification date
11/01/2020 7:16
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