Stripping #The Dress: the importance of contextual information on inter-individual differences in colour perception

Details

Ressource 1Download: Jonauskaite_etal_in_press_Psychological_Research_post-print.pdf (14460.55 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Secondary document(s)
Download: Jonauskaite_etal_2020_Psychological_Research_post-print.pdf (645.95 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_596C7A98068F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Minutes: analyse of a published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Stripping #The Dress: the importance of contextual information on inter-individual differences in colour perception
Journal
Psychological Research
Author(s)
Jonauskaite Domicele, Dael Nele, Parraga C. Alejandro, Chèvre Laetitia, García Sánchez Alejandro, Mohr Christine
ISSN
0340-0727
1430-2772
ISSN-L
0340-0727
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
84
Number
4
Pages
851-865
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
In 2015, a picture of a Dress (henceforth the Dress) triggered popular and scientific interest; some reported seeing the Dress in white and gold (W&G) and others in blue and black (B&B). We aimed to describe the phenomenon and investigate the role of contextualization. Few days after the Dress had appeared on the Internet, we projected it to 240 students on two large screens in the classroom. Participants reported seeing the Dress in B&B (48%), W&G (38%), or blue and brown (B&Br; 7%). Amongst numerous socio-demographic variables, we only observed that W&G viewers were most likely to have always seen the Dress as W&G. In the laboratory, we tested how much contextual information is necessary for the phenomenon to occur. Fifty-seven participants selected colours most precisely matching predominant colours of parts or the full Dress. We presented, in this order, small squares (a), vertical strips (b), and the full Dress (c). We found that (1) B&B, B&Br, and W&G viewers had selected colours differing in lightness and chroma levels for contextualized images only (b, c conditions) and hue for fully contextualized condition only (c) and (2) B&B viewers selected colours most closely matching displayed colours of the Dress. Thus, the Dress phenomenon emerges due to inter-individual differences in subjectively perceived lightness, chroma, and hue, at least when all aspects of the picture need to be integrated. Our results support the previous conclusions that contextual information is key to colour perception; it should be important to understand how this actually happens.
Keywords
Experimental and Cognitive Psychology, Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous), Developmental and Educational Psychology, General Medicine
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation / Careers / P0LAP1_175055
Create date
27/09/2018 16:18
Last modification date
22/05/2020 6:21
Usage data