Deficient neuron-microglia signaling results in impaired functional brain connectivity and social behavior.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_560F71FF6DC5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Deficient neuron-microglia signaling results in impaired functional brain connectivity and social behavior.
Journal
Nature neuroscience
Author(s)
Zhan Y., Paolicelli R.C., Sforazzini F., Weinhard L., Bolasco G., Pagani F., Vyssotski A.L., Bifone A., Gozzi A., Ragozzino D., Gross C.T.
ISSN
1546-1726 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1097-6256
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/2014
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Number
3
Pages
400-406
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Microglia are phagocytic cells that infiltrate the brain during development and have a role in the elimination of synapses during brain maturation. Changes in microglial morphology and gene expression have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it remains unknown whether these changes are a primary cause or a secondary consequence of neuronal deficits. Here we tested whether a primary deficit in microglia was sufficient to induce some autism-related behavioral and functional connectivity deficits. Mice lacking the chemokine receptor Cx3cr1 exhibit a transient reduction of microglia during the early postnatal period and a consequent deficit in synaptic pruning. We show that deficient synaptic pruning is associated with weak synaptic transmission, decreased functional brain connectivity, deficits in social interaction and increased repetitive-behavior phenotypes that have been previously associated with autism and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. These findings open the possibility that disruptions in microglia-mediated synaptic pruning could contribute to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders.
Keywords
Animals, Behavior, Animal/physiology, Brain/metabolism, Brain/pathology, CX3C Chemokine Receptor 1, Connectome/instrumentation, Connectome/methods, Female, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Mice, Knockout, Microglia/metabolism, Microglia/pathology, Neurons/metabolism, Neurons/pathology, Receptors, Chemokine/physiology, Signal Transduction/physiology, Social Behavior, Synapses/metabolism, Synaptic Transmission/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
18/12/2018 11:35
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:10
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