In vivo kinetics of the immunoglobulin E response to allergen: bystander effect of coimmunization and relationship with anaphylaxis

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_554162D1626A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
In vivo kinetics of the immunoglobulin E response to allergen: bystander effect of coimmunization and relationship with anaphylaxis
Journal
Clinical and Experimental Allergy
Author(s)
Von Garnier  C., Astori  M., Kettner  A., Dufour  N., Corradin  G., Spertini  F.
ISSN
0954-7894 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
03/2002
Volume
32
Number
3
Pages
401-10
Notes
Comparative Study
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Mar
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Murine models of hypersensitivity to allergens are useful tools for the evaluation of preclinical strategies to down-regulate the IgE response. OBJECTIVE: To monitor the long-term kinetics of T and B cell responses to allergen as a function of allergen dosage and to investigate the effect of parallel immunization with a second antigen; to correlate B cell response with anaphylaxis. METHODS: CBA/J mice were sensitized every other week by subcutaneous injections of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and/or ovalbumin (OVA) adsorbed to alum. Specific antibody isotype responses, T cell proliferation, T cell cytokine production and anaphylaxis were assessed throughout the sensitization phase. RESULTS: Low-dose immunization with PLA2 (0.1 microg) favoured a long-term, specific T helper (Th)2 response with high IgE and IL-4 production in contrast to high-dose PLA2 (10 microg) immunization, which biased the immune response towards a Th1 response with high IgG2a and low IL-4 production. Parallel immunization with an unrelated antigen (ovalbumin) had a significant bystander effect on the immunization with PLA2, which was also dose-dependent. Finally, although anaphylaxis as measured by rectal temperature drop was allergen-specific, it could be induced in the high- and low-dose immunization groups, and was not solely dependent on IgE levels. CONCLUSION: Though low-dose allergen immunization appears to induce an efficient IgE response, the intensity and quality of this response may be modulated by bystander effects of parallel immunization and does not correlate strictly with anaphylaxis. This observation has relevance to the design of clinical immunotherapy protocols using murine model-based data.
Keywords
Allergens/*immunology/*pharmacology Anaphylaxis/immunology Animals Antibody Specificity/drug effects/immunology B-Lymphocytes/drug effects/immunology Bystander Effect/drug effects/immunology Cytokines/biosynthesis/immunology Disease Models, Animal Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic Female Follow-Up Studies Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology Immunization Immunoglobulin E/*drug effects/*immunology Immunoglobulin G/drug effects/immunology Mice Mice, Inbred CBA Ovalbumin/immunology/pharmacokinetics Phospholipases A/immunology/pharmacokinetics T-Lymphocytes/drug effects/immunology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
24/01/2008 14:54
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:09
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