Pooling of dentin microtensile bond strength data improves clinical correlation.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_53BCAA0D5100
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Pooling of dentin microtensile bond strength data improves clinical correlation.
Journal
Journal of Adhesive Dentistry
Author(s)
Heintze Siegward D., Rousson Valentin
ISSN
1461-5185 (Print)
ISSN-L
1461-5185
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
13
Number
2
Pages
107-110
Language
english
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate whether the correlation between in vitro bond strength data and estimated clinical retention rates of cervical restorations after two years depends on pooled data obtained from multicenter studies or single-test data. Materials and Methods: Pooled mean data for six dentin adhesive systems (Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE, OptiBond FL, Prime & Bond NT, Single Bond, and Scotchbond Multipurpose) and four laboratory methods (macroshear, microshear, macrotensile and microtensile bond strength test) (Scherrer et al, 2010) were correlated to estimated pooled two-year retention rates of Class V restorations using the same adhesive systems. For bond strength data from a single test institute, the literature search in SCOPUS revealed one study that tested all six adhesive systems (microtensile) and two that tested five of the six systems (microtensile, macroshear). The correlation was determined with a database designed to perform a meta-analysis on the clinical performance of cervical restorations (Heintze et al, 2010). The clinical data were pooled and adjusted in a linear mixed model, taking the study effect, dentin preparation, type of isolation and bevelling of enamel into account. A regression analysis was carried out to evaluate the correlation between clinical and laboratory findings. Results: The results of the regression analysis for the pooled data revealed that only the macrotensile (adjusted R2 = 0.86) and microtensile tests (adjusted R2 = 0.64), but not the shear and the microshear tests, correlated well with the clinical findings. As regards the data from a single-test institute, the correlation was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Macrotensile and microtensile bond strength tests showed an adequate correlation with the retention rate of cervical restorations after two years. Bond strength tests should be carried out by different operators and/or research institutes to determine the reliability and technique sensitivity of the material under investigation.
Keywords
Dental Bonding, Dental Research/methods, Dental Restoration, Permanent, Dental Stress Analysis, Dentin-Bonding Agents, Humans, Linear Models, Materials Testing/methods, Meta-Analysis as Topic, Multicenter Studies as Topic, Reproducibility of Results, Resin Cements, Shear Strength, Tensile Strength, Tooth Cervix
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/05/2011 14:55
Last modification date
20/08/2019 15:08
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