Is it possible to individualize intensity of eccentric cycling exercise from perceived exertion on concentric test?

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License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_52F111C2F54E
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Is it possible to individualize intensity of eccentric cycling exercise from perceived exertion on concentric test?
Journal
Arch Phys Med Rehabil
Author(s)
Laroche D., Joussain C., Espagnac C., Morisset C., Tordi N., Gremeaux V., Casillas J. M.
ISSN
1532-821X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0003-9993
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2013
Volume
94
Number
8
Pages
1621-1627 e1
Language
english
Notes
Laroche, Davy
Joussain, Charles
Espagnac, Claire
Morisset, Claire
Tordi, Nicolas
Gremeaux, Vincent
Casillas, Jean-Marie
eng
Clinical Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2013 Aug;94(8):1621-1627.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2012.12.012. Epub 2012 Dec 24.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and acute effects of a procedure using perceived exertion during a prior submaximal concentric (CON) test to individualize eccentric (ECC) cycling exercise intensity. DESIGN: Prospective, monocentric open study. SETTING: Technological investigation platform at a physical medicine and rehabilitation department in a university hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Healthy subjects (N=18; 15 men, 3 women) aged between 22 and 37 years. INTERVENTIONS: The subjects performed 3 cycling exercises: (1) incremental CON test to determine the comfortable pedaling power (CPP) corresponding to a Borg scale rating of 12 (rate of perceived exertion); (2) steady-state CON exercise at the CPP workload to determine the corresponding plantar pressure; and (3) steady-state ECC exercise with an imposed resistance corresponding to the CPP plantar pressure. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rate of perceived exertion on Borg scale, oxygen uptake (V o2), heart rate, cardiac output, and stroke volume using inert gas rebreathing techniques were measured during steady-state CON and ECC exercises. Muscle soreness was rated on a visual analog scale immediately, 24, and 48 hours after the tests. RESULTS: No adverse effects were reported. V o2 was about 5 times the resting value during CON exercise, while it was twice that during ECC exercise. Cardiac output was lower during ECC exercise (P<.05). This moderate increase of cardiac output was exclusively linked to a greater increase in stroke volume during ECC exercise than during CON exercise (P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-intensity ECC cycling exercise tailored according to perceived exertion during a prior CON test is well tolerated. It corresponds to a limited muscular use of oxygen and to an isolated increase in stroke volume. It appears to be a feasible procedure for preconditioning before ECC training.
Keywords
Adult, Bicycling/*physiology, Cardiac Output/physiology, *Exercise Test, *Exercise Therapy, Feasibility Studies, Female, Humans, Male, Oxygen Consumption/physiology, Physical Exertion/*physiology, Prospective Studies, Reproducibility of Results, Young Adult, Co, Con, Cpp, Cardiac output, Doms, Ecc, Exercise, physical, Oxygen consumption, Pf, Rpe, Rehabilitation, Resistance training, Sv, Stroke volume, Vas, Ve, comfortable pedaling power, concentric, delayed-onset muscle soreness, eccentric, expired ventilation, plantar force, rate of perceived exertion, revolutions per minute, rpm, visual analog scale, volume of oxygen uptake
Pubmed
Create date
26/11/2019 12:35
Last modification date
06/05/2020 6:26
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