Comparative descriptive epidemiology of oral and oesophageal cancers in Europe.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_5283
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Comparative descriptive epidemiology of oral and oesophageal cancers in Europe.
Journal
European Journal of Cancer Prevention
Author(s)
Negri E., La Vecchia C., Levi F., Franceschi S., Serra-Majem L., Boyle P.
ISSN
0959-8278 (Print)
ISSN-L
0959-8278
Publication state
Published
Issued date
1996
Volume
5
Number
4
Pages
267-279
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Comparative Study ; Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The two main determinants of oral and oesophageal cancer in Europe are alcohol and tobacco, and the two cancer sites show several similarities in their descriptive epidemiology. This study compares mortality from cancers of the oral cavity and oesophagus in European countries to evaluate similarities and differences. From official death certification numbers and population estimates, we obtained age-standardized rates for all ages and truncated (35-64 years). In most countries, rates for men tended to increase between 1955-59 and 1990-92 for both sites, although the increases were more marked for oral cancer. In the UK and Ireland, however, oral cancer decreased and oesophageal cancer increased, while in Finland and Iceland mortality for both sites decreased. The most striking increases were in Hungary, where the truncated rate in most recent calendar periods reached the highest levels in Europe. In France, rates for both cancers were extremely high: oral cancer increased from 1955-59 to the early 1980s, but started to decline afterwards. Mortality rates were much lower for women than men, and the correlation between the two sites was less marked. An age, period and cohort model, applied to the rates for men in selected European countries, suggested strong cohort effects for both cancers, generally more marked for oral cancer, with substantial increases in the cohorts born after 1920. The mortality rates of cancers of the oral cavity and oesophagus show several analogies, as expected from their relation to tobacco and alcohol; but some discrepancies suggest that other, less well-identified, factors may also influence their rates and trends in Europe.
Keywords
Adult, Alcohol Drinking, Esophageal Neoplasms/mortality, Type="Geographic">Europe/epidemiology, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Mouth Neoplasms/mortality, Sex Factors, Smoking
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
19/11/2007 12:41
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:07
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