Splenic hypereosinophilia in anaphylaxis-related death: different assessments depending on different types of allergens?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_4E91A0F097B3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Splenic hypereosinophilia in anaphylaxis-related death: different assessments depending on different types of allergens?
Journal
International Journal of Legal Medicine
Author(s)
Reggiani Bonetti L., Maccio L., Trani N., Radheshi E., Palmiere C.
ISSN
1437-1596 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0937-9827
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
129
Number
1
Pages
97-103
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate splenic eosinophil and mast cell accumulation using pagoda red stain in a series of anaphylaxis-related deaths that underwent medico-legal investigations. Our goal was to assess whether fatal reactions to insect stings, intramuscularly administered antibiotics and intravenously injected contrast media are responsible for specific patterns of eosinophil and mast cell accumulation. Two study groups were prospectively formed, an anaphylaxis-related death group and a control group. Autopsy, histology (haematoxylin-eosin stain, pagoda red stain and immunohistochemistry using anti-tryptase antibodies), toxicology and postmortem biochemistry (beta-tryptase, total IgE and specific IgE) were performed in all cases. All tested parameters (spleen weight, beta-tryptase and total IgE levels as well as eosinophil, mast cell and degranulated mast cell numbers in the spleen) were significantly higher in the anaphylaxis-related death group. No statistically significant differences were observed among the various groups (intramuscular antibiotic injection, intravenous contrast medium administration and stinging insects) in any combination, suggesting that mast cell and eosinophil accumulation in the spleen during anaphylaxis does not have any specific pattern related to the triggering allergen. Despite a lower sensitivity than immunohistochemical staining in discriminating eosinophil and mast cells, pagoda red stain allowed these cells to be identified and could therefore be proposed as a low-cost, first-line diagnostic procedure in those situations where immunohistochemistry is not systematically performed or cannot be carried out.
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
05/05/2014 8:21
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:04
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