Association of alcohol consumption and HIV surrogate markers in participants of the swiss HIV cohort study.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_4E5878833D35
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Association of alcohol consumption and HIV surrogate markers in participants of the swiss HIV cohort study.
Journal
Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes (1999)
Author(s)
Conen A., Wang Q., Glass T.R., Fux C.A., Thurnheer M.C., Orasch C., Calmy A., Bernasconi E., Vernazza P., Weber R., Bucher H.C., Battegay M., Fehr J.
ISSN
1944-7884 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1525-4135
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2013
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
64
Number
5
Pages
472-478
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov'tPublication Status: ppublish
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption may affect the course of HIV infection and/or antiretroviral therapy (ART). The authors investigated the association between self-reported alcohol consumption and HIV surrogate markers in both treated and untreated individuals.
DESIGN: Prospective cohort study.
METHODS: Over a 7-year period, the authors analyzed 2 groups of individuals in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study: (1) ART-naïve individuals remaining off ART and (2) individuals initiating first ART. For individuals initiating first ART, time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between alcohol consumption, virological failure, and ART interruption. For both groups, trajectories of log-transformed CD4 cell counts were analyzed using linear mixed models with repeated measures.
RESULTS: The authors included 2982 individuals initiating first ART and 2085 ART naives. In individuals initiating first ART, 241 (8%) experienced virological failure. Alcohol consumption was not associated with virological failure. ART interruption was noted in 449 (15%) individuals and was more prevalent in severe compared with none/light health risk drinkers [hazard ratio: 2.24, 95% confidence interval: 1.42 to 3.52]. The association remained significant even after adjusting for nonadherence. The authors did not find an association between alcohol consumption and change in CD4 cell count over time in either group.
CONCLUSIONS: No effect of alcohol consumption on either virological failure or CD4 cell count in both groups of ART-initiating and ART-naive individuals was found. However, severe drinkers were more likely to interrupt ART. Efforts on ART continuation should be especially implemented in individuals reporting high alcohol consumption.
Keywords
Adult, Alcohol Drinking/adverse effects, Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use, Biological Markers, CD4 Lymphocyte Count, Cohort Studies, Female, HIV Infections/drug therapy, HIV Infections/epidemiology, Humans, Male, Medication Adherence/statistics & numerical data, Middle Aged, Switzerland/epidemiology, Viral Load
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
07/03/2014 17:57
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:03
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