Use of an isothermal microcalorimetry assay to characterize microbial oxalotrophic activity

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_4A8B8400CF49
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Use of an isothermal microcalorimetry assay to characterize microbial oxalotrophic activity
Journal
FEMS Microbiology Ecology
Author(s)
Bravo D., Braissant O., Solokhina A., Clerc M., Daniels A.U., Verrecchia E.P., Junier P.
ISSN
0168-6496
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
78
Pages
266-274
Language
english
Abstract
Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) has been used in the past to monitor metabolic activities in living systems. A few studies have used it on ecological research. In this study, IMC was used to monitor oxalotrophic activity, a widespread bacterial metabolism found in the environment, and particularly in soils. Six model strains were inoculated in solid angle media with K-oxalate as the sole carbon source. Cupriavidus oxalaticus, Cupriavidus necator, and Streptomyces violaceoruber presented the highest activity (91, 40, and 55 μW, respectively) and a maximum growth rate (μmax h(-1) ) of 0.264, 0.185, and 0.199, respectively, among the strains tested. These three strains were selected to test the incidence of different oxalate sources (Ca, Cu, and Fe-oxalate salts) in the metabolic activity. The highest activity was obtained in Ca-oxalate for C. oxalaticus. Similar experiments were carried out with a model soil to test whether this approach can be used to measure oxalotrophic activity in field samples. Although measuring oxalotrophic activity in a soil was challenging, there was a clear effect of the amendment with oxalate on the metabolic activity measured in soil. The correlation between heat flow and growth suggests that IMC analysis is a powerful method to monitor bacterial oxalotrophic activity
Open Access
Yes
Create date
09/02/2012 15:34
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:09
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