Host-pathogen biotic interactions shaped vitamin K metabolism in Archaeplastida.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_4A723C8DAA6B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Host-pathogen biotic interactions shaped vitamin K metabolism in Archaeplastida.
Journal
Scientific reports
Author(s)
Cenci U., Qiu H., Pillonel T., Cardol P., Remacle C., Colleoni C., Kadouche D., Chabi M., Greub G., Bhattacharya D., Ball S.G.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
15/10/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
8
Number
1
Pages
15243
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Menaquinone (vitamin K <sub>2</sub> ) shuttles electrons between membrane-bound respiratory complexes under microaerophilic conditions. In photosynthetic eukaryotes and cyanobacteria, phylloquinone (vitamin K <sub>1</sub> ) participates in photosystem I function. Here we elucidate the evolutionary history of vitamin K metabolism in algae and plants. We show that Chlamydiales intracellular pathogens made major genetic contributions to the synthesis of the naphthoyl ring core and the isoprenoid side-chain of these quinones. Production of the core in extremophilic red algae is under control of a menaquinone (Men) gene cluster consisting of 7 genes that putatively originated via lateral gene transfer (LGT) from a chlamydial donor to the plastid genome. In other green and red algae, functionally related nuclear genes also originated via LGT from a non-cyanobacterial, albeit unidentified source. In addition, we show that 3-4 of the 9 required steps for synthesis of the isoprenoid side chains are under control of genes of chlamydial origin. These results are discussed in the light of the hypoxic response experienced by the cyanobacterial endosymbiont when it gained access to the eukaryotic cytosol.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
02/11/2018 16:35
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:58
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