Social roles and alcohol consumption: a study of 10 industrialised countries.

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State: Public
Version: author
Serval ID
serval:BIB_4A4CBBEE40E1
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Social roles and alcohol consumption: a study of 10 industrialised countries.
Journal
Social Science & Medicine
Author(s)
Kuntsche S., Knibbe R.A., Gmel G.
ISSN
0277-9536
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2009
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
68
Number
7
Pages
1263-70
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
The empirical evidence as regards the precise associations between alcohol use and social roles, and these associations across genders and cultures is heterogeneous. The literature tends to focus on two central but conflicting theories. The first - classic role theory - assumes that a higher number of social roles is associated with a more structured life and thus fewer opportunities to drink heavily. The second - the multiple burden hypothesis - posits that the increasing complexity of multiple social roles leads to higher stress levels, and thus to increased alcohol use. Survey data on 25-54-year olds in 10 western industrialised countries which participate in the Gender, Alcohol and Culture: An International Study (GenACIS) project were used to test whether holding the three main social roles - partnership, parenthood, and paid labour - had a more protective or a more detrimental association with problematic alcohol use than holding fewer roles. Age and education were included as possible confounders, while the outcome variables were risky single occasion drinking (RSOD) and heavy-volume drinking. For both men and women and in almost all countries, the study found that those who had all three roles were least likely to drink heavily or engage in RSOD, thus supporting the assumptions of classic role theory. It also found that the protective effect of multiple roles was more consistent for RSOD. There were a few countries where a two-role model gave a better fit. Results for Germany (RSOD), Switzerland, and the Unites States (heavy-volume drinking) indicate that the role of paid labour appears to be particularly relevant for risky alcohol use among women. Despite some variability in the association between paid labour and heavy drinking or RSOD among women, in almost all countries the greater the number of roles a person held, the lower their risk of this type of alcohol use was.
Keywords
Adult, Alcohol Drinking/epidemiology, Alcohol Drinking/prevention & control, Cross-Cultural Comparison, Cross-Sectional Studies, Developed Countries/statistics & numerical data, Ethanol/poisoning, Female, Humans, Logistic Models, Male, Poisoning/epidemiology, Risk Assessment, Role, Stress, Psychological/epidemiology, World Health
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
20/01/2010 16:23
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:57
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