Occupational exposure to inhalative irritants and methacholine responsiveness

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_494D7CF16973
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Occupational exposure to inhalative irritants and methacholine responsiveness
Journal
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health
Author(s)
Leuenberger  P., Schindler  C., Schwartz  J., Ackermann-Liebrich  U., Tara  D., Perruchoud  A. P., Wuthrich  B., Zellweger  J. P., Blaser  K., Bolognini  G., Bongard  J. P., Brandli  O., Domenighetti  G., Elsasser  S., Grize  L., Karrer  W., Keller  R., Kunzli  N., Medici  T., Schoni  M. H., Solari  G., Tschopp  J. M., Villiger  B., Zemp  E.
ISSN
0355-3140 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
04/2000
Volume
26
Number
2
Pages
146-52
Notes
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Apr
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Occupational exposures to inhalative irritants have been associated with an increased reporting of respiratory symptoms in previous studies. Methacholine responsiveness represents a continuous measure of airway responsiveness. As such, it may be less subject to recall bias and more sensitive to detecting effects of occupational exposure on airways. Such effects may be stronger among atopic persons. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between self-reports of occupational exposure to dusts, gases, vapors, aerosols, and fumes and methacholine responsiveness. METHODS: A sample was studied of never smokers (N=3044) chosen randomly from 8 areas in Switzerland. Atopy was defined as any positive skin test to 8 inhalative allergens. Nonspecific bronchial reactivity was tested using methacholine chloride and quantified by calculating the slope of the dose-response. RESULTS: The methacholine slopes were 19% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 6-32] higher for never smokers with exposure to dusts, fumes, vapors, gases, or aerosols than for the unexposed group. When only atopic never smokers were examined. the increase was larger (37%, 95% CI 7-75), and for persons with >2 positive skin prick tests the effect was still higher (42%, 95% CI -1.5-104). Exposure to vapors and aerosols was strongly associated with increased methacholine slopes among the atopic subjects. CONCLUSIONS: Occupational exposure, particularly to dusts and fumes, was associated with increased bronchial reactivity in never smokers in this study. The magnitude of the effect was larger among atopic subjects.
Keywords
Adolescent Adult Air Pollutants, Occupational/adverse effects Bronchial Hyperreactivity/*diagnosis/epidemiology/immunology Bronchial Provocation Tests Bronchoconstrictor Agents/*diagnostic use Confidence Intervals Environmental Monitoring/*methods/statistics & numerical data Female Forced Expiratory Volume Humans Incidence Irritants/*adverse effects/immunology Male Methacholine Chloride/*diagnostic use Middle Aged Occupational Exposure/*adverse effects Patch Tests Patient Participation Reference Values Risk Factors Sampling Studies Smoking/adverse effects/epidemiology Switzerland/epidemiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 10:50
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:56
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