Slow life history and rapid extreme flood: demographic mechanisms and their consequences on population viability in a threatened amphibian

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_48B6D5803592
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Slow life history and rapid extreme flood: demographic mechanisms and their consequences on population viability in a threatened amphibian
Journal
Freshwater Biology
Author(s)
Hugo Cayuela, Dragan Arsovski, Sylvain Boitaud, Eric Bonnaire, Laurent Boualit, Claude Miaud, Pierre Joly, Aurelien Besnard
ISSN
0046-5070
Publication state
Published
Issued date
06/08/2015
Language
english
Abstract
In the Northern Hemisphere, an increase in both the frequency and magnitude of violent flooding events has been reported due to climate change. According to life history theory, one might postulate that in ‘slow’ species: (i) environmental canalisation may act as a selective force that minimises to some extent adult survival variations caused by catastrophic flood and (ii) extreme flooding events would cause important variations in recruitment and young survival. Hence, it may be hypothesised that (iii) the population growth rate of ‘slow’ species might be relatively insensitive to changes in the frequency of extreme climatic events if adult survival remains largely unaffected.In this study, we investigated how extreme rainfall events resulting in severe flood impact population dynamics of a long-lived endangered amphibian, the yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata: Bombinatoridae). To address this issue, we used capture–recapture (CR) data collected on two populations (768 and 1154 individuals identified) in southern France and developed multi-event CR models.Our results indicated that extreme flooding did not cause any variation in sub-adult or adult survival, whereas recruitment and juvenile survival were negatively impacted. Furthermore, our simulations indicated that the population growth rate was only marginally sensitive to potential changes in the frequency of extreme flooding in the future.Hence, we suggest that extreme flooding does not appear to be a proximal factor of extinction risk for this endangered amphibian species.
Keywords
amphibian, Bombina variegata, flood, life history, multi-event capture–recapture model
Create date
28/11/2019 14:52
Last modification date
14/07/2020 9:19
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