Forgetting of emotional information is hard: an fMRI study of directed forgetting

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Serval ID
serval:BIB_47B99FAEA4DF
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Forgetting of emotional information is hard: an fMRI study of directed forgetting
Journal
Cerebral Cortex (new York, N.y. : 1991)
Author(s)
Nowicka A., Marchewka A., Jednoróg K., Tacikowski P., Brechmann A.
ISSN
1460-2199 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1047-3211
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Volume
21
Number
3
Pages
539-549
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Strong evidence suggests that memory for emotional information is much better than for neutral one. Thus, one may expect that forgetting of emotional information is difficult and requires considerable effort. The aim of this item-method directed forgetting functional magnetic resonance imaging study was to investigate this hypothesis both at behavioral and neural levels. Directed forgetting effects were observed for both neutral and emotionally negative International Affective Picture System images. Moreover, recognition rate of negative to-be-forgotten images was higher than in case of neutral ones. In the study phase, intention to forget and successful forgetting of emotionally negative images were associated with widespread activations extending from the anterior to posterior regions mainly in the right hemisphere, whereas in the case of neutral images, they were associated with just one cluster of activation in the right lingual gyrus. Therefore, forgetting of emotional information seems to be a demanding process that strongly activates a distributed neural network in the right hemisphere. In the test phase, in turn, successfully forgotten images--either neutral or emotionally negative--were associated with virtually no activation, even at the lowered P value threshold. These results suggest that intentional inhibition during encoding may be an efficient strategy to cope with emotionally negative memories.
Keywords
Emotions/physiology, Memory/physiology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/07/2018 9:00
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:09
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