Good genes drive female choice for mating partners in the lek-breeding European treefrog.

Details

Ressource 1Download: BIB_46C30056B3C5.P001.pdf (27.98 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Author's accepted manuscript
Serval ID
serval:BIB_46C30056B3C5
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Good genes drive female choice for mating partners in the lek-breeding European treefrog.
Journal
Evolution
Author(s)
Jaquiéry J., Broquet T., Aguilar C., Evanno G., Perrin N.
ISSN
1558-5646[electronic], 0014-3820[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
64
Number
1
Pages
108-115
Language
english
Abstract
Investigating the mechanisms underlying female mate choice is important for sexual-selection theory, but also for population-genetic studies, because distinctive breeding strategies affect differently the dynamics of gene diversity within populations. Using field-monitoring, genetic-assignment, and laboratory-rearing methods, we investigated chorus attendance, mating success and offspring fitness in a population of lek-breeding tree-frogs (Hyla arborea) to test whether female choice is driven by good genes or complementary genes. Chorus attendance explained approximately 50% of the variance in male mating success, but did not correlate with offspring fitness. By contrast, offspring body mass and growth rate correlated with male attractiveness, measured as the number of matings obtained per night of calling. Genetic similarity between mating partners did not depart from random, and did not affect offspring fitness. We conclude that females are able to choose good partners under natural settings and obtain benefits from the good genes, rather than compatible genes, their offspring inherit. This heritability of fitness is likely to reduce effective population sizes below values previously estimated.
Keywords
Female choice, good genes, Hyla arborea, lek, sexual selection, heritability of fitness
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
12/08/2009 9:23
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:52
Usage data