Strategies and cognitive reserve to preserve lexical production in aging.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_43C7DAE99E97
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Strategies and cognitive reserve to preserve lexical production in aging.
Journal
GeroScience
Author(s)
Baciu M., Banjac S., Roger E., Haldin C., Perrone-Bertolotti M., Lœvenbruck H., Démonet J.F.
ISSN
2509-2723 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2509-2723
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
43
Number
4
Pages
1725-1765
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Review
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In the absence of any neuropsychiatric condition, older adults may show declining performance in several cognitive processes and among them, in retrieving and producing words, reflected in slower responses and even reduced accuracy compared to younger adults. To overcome this difficulty, healthy older adults implement compensatory strategies, which are the focus of this paper. We provide a review of mainstream findings on deficient mechanisms and possible neurocognitive strategies used by older adults to overcome the deleterious effects of age on lexical production. Moreover, we present findings on genetic and lifestyle factors that might either be protective or risk factors of cognitive impairment in advanced age. We propose that "aging-modulating factors" (AMF) can be modified, offering prevention opportunities against aging effects. Based on our review and this proposition, we introduce an integrative neurocognitive model of mechanisms and compensatory strategies for lexical production in older adults (entitled Lexical Access and Retrieval in Aging, LARA). The main hypothesis defended in LARA is that cognitive aging evolves heterogeneously and involves complementary domain-general and domain-specific mechanisms, with substantial inter-individual variability, reflected at behavioral, cognitive, and brain levels. Furthermore, we argue that the ability to compensate for the effect of cognitive aging depends on the amount of reserve specific to each individual which is, in turn, modulated by the AMF. Our conclusion is that a variety of mechanisms and compensatory strategies coexist in the same individual to oppose the effect of age. The role of reserve is pivotal for a successful coping with age-related changes and future research should continue to explore the modulating role of AMF.
Keywords
Behavioral, Brain, Healthy aging, Lexical, Production, Reserve factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/05/2021 14:41
Last modification date
23/10/2021 5:38
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