The rise of the e-bike: Towards an extension of the practice of cycling?

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Ressource 1Download: Mobilities E-bike 2021.pdf (885.78 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: Not specified
Serval ID
serval:BIB_439DC6F3C19A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
The rise of the e-bike: Towards an extension of the practice of cycling?
Journal
Mobilities
Author(s)
Rérat Patrick
ISSN
1745-0101
1745-011X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
13/03/2021
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-17
Language
english
Abstract
E-bikes are bicycles with a battery-powered motor assisting the rider. With sales rising rapidly in many countries, e-bikes are likely to become a key component of a transition towards a low-carbon mobility. However, there is a scarcity of research into either the similarities or the differences between the practice of e-cycling and conventional cycling. The paper proposes a theoretical framework to address (e-)cycling based on the notions of motility (individuals’ cycling potential) and bikeability (spaces’ hosting potential). The framework is applied to a large-scale survey (14,000 bike commuters in Switzerland). The analysis shows that the e-bike makes it possible to overcome some of the barriers faced by conventional cyclists, such as distance, gradient and physical effort. The e-bike empowers more people to cycle, across social groups (women, couples with children, people over 40, people with a lower physical condition) and spatial contexts (suburban and rural areas). By reaching groups and spaces that are more motorised than average, the e-bike expands the practice of cycling as a complement or alternative to automobility. However, both e-cycling and conventional cycling share many characteristics (e.g. motivations) and face similar challenges (in terms of a lack of infrastructures, etc.).
Keywords
cycling, e-bike, practice, sustainable mobility
Open Access
Yes
Create date
14/03/2021 22:10
Last modification date
16/03/2021 8:08
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