Temperature evolution following joint loading promotes chondrogenesis by synergistic cues via calcium signaling.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_415F6782807D
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Temperature evolution following joint loading promotes chondrogenesis by synergistic cues via calcium signaling.
Journal
eLife
Author(s)
Nasrollahzadeh N., Karami P., Wang J., Bagheri L., Guo Y., Abdel-Sayed P., Laurent-Applegate L., Pioletti D.P.
ISSN
2050-084X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2050-084X
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/03/2022
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Pages
e72068
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
During loading of viscoelastic tissues, part of the mechanical energy is transformed into heat that can locally increase the tissue temperature, a phenomenon known as self-heating. In the framework of mechanobiology, it has been accepted that cells react and adapt to mechanical stimuli. However, the cellular effect of temperature increase as a by-product of loading has been widely neglected. In this work, we focused on cartilage self-heating to present a 'thermo-mechanobiological' paradigm, and demonstrate how the coupling of a biomimetic temperature evolution and mechanical loading could influence cell behavior. We thereby developed a customized in vitro system allowing to recapitulate pertinent in vivo physical cues and determined the cells chondrogenic response to thermal and/or mechanical stimuli. Cellular mechanisms of action and potential signaling pathways of thermo-mechanotransduction process were also investigated. We found that co-existence of thermo-mechanical cues had a superior effect on chondrogenic gene expression compared to either signal alone. Specifically, the expression of Sox9 was significantly upregulated by application of the physiological thermo-mechanical stimulus. Multimodal transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels were identified as key mediators of thermo-mechanotransduction process, which becomes ineffective without external calcium sources. We also observed that the isolated temperature evolution, as a by-product of loading, is a contributing factor to the cell response and this could be considered as important as the conventional mechanical loading. Providing an optimal thermo-mechanical environment by synergy of heat and loading portrays new opportunity for development of novel treatments for cartilage regeneration and can furthermore signal key elements for emerging cell-based therapies.
Keywords
General Immunology and Microbiology, General Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology, General Medicine, General Neuroscience, TRPV4 channels, calcium signaling, cartilage self-heating, cell biology, human, mechanobiology, regenerative medicine, stem cells, thermo-mechanotransduction, tissue viscoelasticity
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Funding(s)
Swiss National Science Foundation
Swiss National Science Foundation
Create date
11/03/2022 10:23
Last modification date
23/04/2022 6:35
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