Anti-tumor immunotherapy via antigen delivery from a live attenuated genetically engineered Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system-based vector

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_4072164F6485
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Anti-tumor immunotherapy via antigen delivery from a live attenuated genetically engineered Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system-based vector
Journal
Mol Ther
Author(s)
Epaulard O., Toussaint B., Quenee L., Derouazi M., Bosco N., Villiers C., Le Berre R., Guery B., Filopon D., Crombez L., Marche P. N., Polack B.
ISSN
1525-0016 (Print)
ISSN-L
1525-0016
Publication state
Published
Issued date
11/2006
Volume
14
Number
5
Pages
656-61
Language
english
Notes
Epaulard, Olivier
Toussaint, Bertrand
Quenee, Lauriane
Derouazi, Madiha
Bosco, Nabil
Villiers, Christian
Le Berre, Rozenn
Guery, Benoit
Filopon, Didier
Crombez, Laurence
Marche, Patrice N
Polack, Benoit
eng
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Mol Ther. 2006 Nov;14(5):656-61. doi: 10.1016/j.ymthe.2006.06.011. Epub 2006 Sep 27.
Abstract
Immunotherapy requiring an efficient T lymphocyte response is initiated by antigen delivery to antigen-presenting cells. Several studies have assessed the efficiency of various antigen loading procedures, including microbial vectors. Here a live strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was engineered to translocate a recombinant antigenic protein into mammalian cells via the type III secretion system, a bacterial device translocating effector proteins into host cells. Optimization of the vector included virulence attenuation and determination of the N-terminal sequence allowing translocation of fused antigens into cells. In vitro delivery of an ovalbumin fragment by the bacterial vector into dendritic cells induced the activation of ovalbumin-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes. Mice injected with the ovalbumin-delivering vector developed ovalbumin-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes and were resistant to a subsequent challenge with an ovalbumin-expressing melanoma. Moreover, in a curative assay, injection of the vaccine vector 5 and 12 days after tumor implantation led to a complete cure in five of six animals. These results highlight the utility of type III secretion system-based vectors for anti-tumor immunotherapy.
Keywords
Animals, Antigens/*immunology, Cells, Cultured, Dendritic Cells/immunology, Genetic Engineering, Genetic Therapy, Genetic Vectors/*genetics, *Immunotherapy, Mice, Neoplasms/*genetics/*immunology/therapy, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/*genetics
Pubmed
Create date
29/04/2021 10:59
Last modification date
30/04/2021 6:38
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