Introducing "A Question That Might, Perhaps, Scare you": How Geriatric Physicians Approach the Discussion About Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation with Hospitalized Patients.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
License: CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_3F0336D6C895
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Introducing "A Question That Might, Perhaps, Scare you": How Geriatric Physicians Approach the Discussion About Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation with Hospitalized Patients.
Journal
Health communication
Author(s)
Sterie A.C., Weber O., Jox R.J., Rubli Truchard E.
ISSN
1532-7027 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1041-0236
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-10
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Decisions about the relevance of life-sustaining treatment, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), are commonly made when a patient is admitted to the hospital. This article aims to refine our understanding of how discussions about CPR are introduced, to identify and classify the components frequently occurring in these introductions, and discuss their implications within the overarching activity (discussing CPR). We recorded 43 discussions about CPR between physicians and patients, taking place during the admission interview. We applied an inductive qualitative content analysis and thematic analysis to all the encounter content from the launch of the conversation on CPR to the point at which the physician formulated a question or the patient an answer. We identified this part of the encounter as the "introduction." This systematic method allowed us to code the material, develop and assign themes and subthemes, and quantify it. We identified four major themes in the introductions: (i) agenda setting; (ii) circumstances leading to CPR (subthemes: types of circumstances, personal prognostics of cardiac arrest); (iii) the activity of addressing CPR with the patient (subthemes: routine, constrain, precedence, sensitivity); and (iv) mentioning advance directives. Our findings reveal the elaborate effort that physicians deploy by appealing to combinations of these themes to account for the need to launch conversations about CPR, and highlight how CPR emerges as a sensitive topic.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
13/11/2023 14:21
Last modification date
19/12/2023 7:13
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