Sex-specific risks and trends in lung cancer mortality across occupations and economic activities in Switzerland (1990-2014).

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3EDA5C3C968A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Sex-specific risks and trends in lung cancer mortality across occupations and economic activities in Switzerland (1990-2014).
Journal
Occupational and environmental medicine
Author(s)
Bovio N., Richardson D.B., Guseva Canu I.
ISSN
1470-7926 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1351-0711
Publication state
Published
Issued date
08/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
77
Number
8
Pages
540-548
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
To assess lung cancer mortality across occupations and economic activities/industries in Switzerland using three statistical estimates.
All Swiss residents aged 18-65 during the 1990 or 2000 censuses were followed through 2014 to ascertain information on date and cause of death. For every occupation and economic activity/industry, causal mortality ratios (CMR) and standardised mortality ratios (SMR) were computed using national cause-specific mortality rates. We also calculated relative SMR (rSMR) and conducted analyses stratified by socioeconomic variables, job skill level and calendar periods.
The study sample comprised 5 834 618 participants (111 162 348 person-years). SMR and CMR led to similar results, while rSMR were generally higher. We found 18 occupations in men, 10 occupations in women and 3 industries in each sex with an excess of lung cancer mortality. Among men, rubber and plastic products machine operators, and workers in mining and quarrying, and construction industries were at high risk. Among women, motor vehicle drivers and workers in trade, repair of motor vehicles and of domestic articles and manufacture of goods industries showed the highest risks. In both sexes, hotel and restaurant workers presented an excess of lung cancer mortality.
Most of the activities and occupations in which we observed excess lung cancer mortality have previously been observed to involve occupational exposure to lung carcinogens. These findings suggest that the number of occupational lung cancer is likely underestimated by the official Swiss statistics. Further research should address this question and the exposure-effect relationships in the most at-risk occupational groups.
Keywords
cancer, epidemiology
Pubmed
Create date
19/05/2020 10:10
Last modification date
28/07/2020 5:21
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