Impact of Study Design on Reported Incidences of Acute Mountain Sickness: A Systematic Review.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3D7FC080347C
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Impact of Study Design on Reported Incidences of Acute Mountain Sickness: A Systematic Review.
Journal
High Altitude Medicine and Biology
Author(s)
Waeber B., Kayser B., Dumont L., Lysakowski C., Tramèr M.R., Elia N.
ISSN
1557-8682 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1527-0297
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Volume
16
Number
3
Pages
204-215
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
UNLABELLED: Waeber, Baptiste, Bengt Kayser, Lionel Dumont, Christopher Lysakowski, Martin R. Tramèr, and Nadia Elia. Impact of study design on reported incidences of acute mountain sickness: A systematic review. High Alt Med Biol 16:204-215, 2015.-
AIMS: Published incidences of acute mountain sickness (AMS) vary widely. Reasons for this variation, and predictive factors of AMS, are not well understood. We aimed to identify predictive factors that are associated with the occurrence of AMS, and to test the hypothesis that study design is an independent predictive factor of AMS incidence. We did a systematic search (Medline, bibliographies) for relevant articles in English or French, up to April 28, 2013. Studies of any design reporting on AMS incidence in humans without prophylaxis were selected. Data on incidence and potential predictive factors were extracted by two reviewers and crosschecked by four reviewers. Associations between predictive factors and AMS incidence were sought through bivariate and multivariate analyses for different study designs separately. Association between AMS incidence and study design was assessed using multiple linear regression.
RESULTS: We extracted data from 53,603 subjects from 34 randomized controlled trials, 44 cohort studies, and 33 cross-sectional studies. In randomized trials, the median of AMS incidences without prophylaxis was 60% (range, 16%-100%); mode of ascent and population were significantly associated with AMS incidence. In cohort studies, the median of AMS incidences was 51% (0%-100%); geographical location was significantly associated with AMS incidence. In cross-sectional studies, the median of AMS incidences was 32% (0%-68%); mode of ascent and maximum altitude were significantly associated with AMS incidence. In a multivariate analysis, study design (p=0.012), mode of ascent (p=0.003), maximum altitude (p<0.001), population (p=0.002), and geographical location (p<0.001) were significantly associated with AMS incidence. Age, sex, speed of ascent, duration of exposure, or history of AMS were inconsistently reported and therefore not further analyzed.
CONCLUSIONS: Reported incidences and identifiable predictive factors of AMS depend on study design.
Pubmed
Create date
28/09/2015 6:18
Last modification date
24/01/2020 7:26
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