Determinants of smoking and cessation in older women

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_3D5BBF097ACB.P001 (96.34 [Ko])
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_3D5BBF097ACB
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Determinants of smoking and cessation in older women
Journal
Age and Ageing
Author(s)
Donze  J., Ruffieux  C., Cornuz  J.
ISSN
0002-0729 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
36
Number
1
Pages
53-7
Notes
Journal Article Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't --- Old month value: Jan
Abstract
BACKGROUND: although the benefits of quitting smoking even at an advanced age have been proved, few campaigns target the older population. The goals of this study were to analyse the characteristics of older women smokers help and support those wanting to quit. METHODS: we assessed the determinants of smoking cessation in a prospective cohort study performed in 7,609 older women. A questionnaire about smoking habits was sent to the 486 eligible smokers. Smoking dependence and smokers' readiness to quit was assessed. Participants who had quit smoking during follow-up were asked about their previous reasons for quitting and the methods used to quit. RESULTS: 372 women of the 424 (88%) responded to our questionnaire and were included. The most common reasons for smoking were relaxation, pleasure, and habit. Major obstacles to quitting smoking were 'no benefit to quitting at an advanced age', 'smoking few or "light" cigarettes yields no negative health consequences', and 'smoking does not increase osteoporotic risk'. During the 3-year follow-up period, 57 of the 372 (15%) women successfully quit smoking. Being an occasional smoker (OR=2.4) and reporting 'quitting is not difficult' (OR=3.7) were positively associated with having recently quit smoking. Only 11% of successful cessations were reported to have received physician advice. CONCLUSIONS: these data illustrate the specific smoking behaviour of older women, suggesting that cessation interventions ought to be tailored to these characteristics. Willingness to quit was associated with a low education level. The most frequent obstacles to quitting were all based on incorrect information.
Keywords
Age Factors Aged Aged, 80 and over Cohort Studies Educational Status *Epidemiologic Factors Female Health Surveys Humans Motivation Osteoporosis/etiology/prevention & control Patient Education Physician-Patient Relations Prospective Studies Smoking/adverse effects/physiopathology/*psychology Smoking Cessation/*psychology Tobacco Use Disorder/physiopathology
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
25/01/2008 14:41
Last modification date
25/09/2019 7:09
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