Hypertension Prevalence Based on Blood Pressure Measurements on Two vs. One Visits: A Community-Based Screening Programme and a Narrative Review.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3D1507BC2550
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Review (review): journal as complete as possible of one specific subject, written based on exhaustive analyses from published work.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Hypertension Prevalence Based on Blood Pressure Measurements on Two vs. One Visits: A Community-Based Screening Programme and a Narrative Review.
Journal
International journal of environmental research and public health
Author(s)
Plumettaz C., Viswanathan B., Bovet P.
ISSN
1660-4601 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1660-4601
Publication state
Published
Issued date
15/12/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
17
Number
24
Pages
9395
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
We assessed the difference in the prevalence of hypertension in community surveys when blood pressure (BP) was measured on two vs. one visits and its impact on hypertension awareness, treatment and control proportions. A community-based BP screening programme was conducted in public places in the Seychelles (619 adults) and BP was rechecked a few days later among untreated participants with high BP (≥140/90 mmHg). A narrative review of the literature on this question was also conducted. Only 64% of untreated participants with high BP still had high BP at the second visit. The prevalence of hypertension in the whole sample decreased by 13% (from 33.8% to 29.5%) when BP was measured on two vs. one visits. These results concurred with our findings in our narrative review based on 10 surveys. In conclusion, the prevalence of hypertension can be markedly overestimated in community surveys when BP is measured on two vs. one visits. The overestimation could be addressed by measuring BP on a second visit among untreated individuals with high BP or, possibly, by taking more readings at the first visit. These findings have relevance for clinical practice, policy and surveillance.
Keywords
blood pressure, hypertension, prevalence, screening, surveillance
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
29/12/2020 15:32
Last modification date
23/02/2021 7:26
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