Exploring epidermal stem cell engraftment

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3C5BDD27421F
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Exploring epidermal stem cell engraftment
Title of the conference
45th Congress of the European Society for Surgical Research
Author(s)
Grasset Nicolas, Gorostidi Francois, Barrandon Yann
Address
Geneva - Switzerland, 9-12 June, 2010
ISBN
0007-1323
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
97
Series
British Journal of Surgery
Pages
S32
Language
english
Notes
Meeting Abstract
Abstract
Objective:
Cultured autologous epidermal stem cells are used to treat extensively burned patients. However, engraftment is variable and it is fundamental to know 1- how many stem cells survive the stress of transplantation and 2- how many stem cells are needed for long-term self-renewal of the regenerated epidermis. Therefore, we have recapitulated the transplantation of autologous cultured epidermal stem cells in the minipig to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in engraftment.
Methods:
Pig keratinocytes were cultivated according to the protocol used in human epidermal cell therapy. Human surgical procedures were adapted to the pig. Engraftment was evaluated clinically and by histology. The presence of epidermal stem cells was evaluated by clonal analysis. The presence of dividing or apoptotic cells was revealed by Ki67 and cleaved-caspase3 immunostaining respectively.
Results:
The skin of the pig closely resembles human skin and contains clonogenic keratinocytes that can be serially cultivated, cloned or transduced with a gene encoding GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein) by means of recombinant retroviral vectors. Cultured epidermal autografts can be successfully transplanted and their behavior recapitulate our observations in the human. Our experiments confirm that the number of epidermal stem cells rapidly decreases following transplantation. Most importantly, the regenerated epithelium contains dividing cells but little apoptotic cells, thus indicating that transplanted stem cells are pushed toward differentiation in response to the transplantation procedure.
Conclusions:
The minipig model is extremely useful to investigate stem cell fate during transplantation in human. Understanding engraftment is crucial to improve cell therapy and to design a more efficient generation of epidermal stem cell based products.
Web of science
Create date
21/10/2010 10:24
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:32
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