Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and mortality: results from the EPIDOS cohort.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3BE554F0FFA2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Motoric cognitive risk syndrome and mortality: results from the EPIDOS cohort.
Journal
European journal of neurology
Author(s)
Beauchet O., Sekhon H., Launay C.P., Chabot J., Rolland Y., Schott A.M., Allali G.
ISSN
1468-1331 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1351-5101
Publication state
Published
Issued date
05/2019
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
26
Number
5
Pages
794-e56
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Cognitive impairment, slow walking speed and motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR) have separately been associated with an increased risk for mortality in the short term. The aim of the study was to examine the association of MCR and its components [i.e. subjective cognitive complaint (SCC) and slow walking speed] with short-, medium- and long-term mortality in older community-dwellers.
In all, 3778 participants from the Epidémiologie de l'Ostéoporose (EPIDOS) study were selected. MCR was defined as the combination of slow walking speed and SCC in participants without major neurocognitive disorders. Deaths were prospectively recorded using mail, phone calls, questionnaires and/or the French national death registry at 5, 10, 15 and 19 (end of follow-up period) years.
Over the follow-up of 19 years, 80.5% (n = 3043) participants died. Slow walking speed and MCR were associated with mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.20 with P = 0.004 for slow walking speed and HR = 1.26 with P = 0.002 for MCR at 10 years; HR = 1.27 with P ≤ 0.001 for slow walking speed and HR = 1.22 with P = 0.001 for MCR at 15 years; HR = 1.41 with P ≤ 0.001 at 19 years for slow walking speed and MCR]. There was no association between SCC and mortality. Kaplan-Meier distributions of mortality showed that participants with MCR and slow walking speed died earlier compared to healthy participants and those with SCC (P < 0.001).
Slow walking speed and MCR were associated with an increased risk for mortality at the medium and long term, whereas no association was found with SCC.
Keywords
Aged, Aged, 80 and over, Cognition Disorders/mortality, Cognition Disorders/psychology, Cognitive Dysfunction, Cohort Studies, Disease Progression, Female, France/epidemiology, Humans, Kaplan-Meier Estimate, Male, Movement Disorders/mortality, Movement Disorders/psychology, Neuropsychological Tests, Survival Analysis, Syndrome, Walking Speed, cognition, cohort study, death, epidemiology, older adults
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
23/01/2019 12:19
Last modification date
12/08/2020 6:22
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