Molecular epidemiology reveals long-term changes in HIV type 1 subtype B transmission in Switzerland.

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Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_3B1EDABE8EB2.P001 (1473.09 [Ko])
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It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_3B1EDABE8EB2
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Molecular epidemiology reveals long-term changes in HIV type 1 subtype B transmission in Switzerland.
Journal
Journal of Infectious Diseases
Author(s)
Kouyos Roger D., von Wyl Viktor, Yerly Sabine, Boeni Juerg, Taffe Patrick, Shah Cyril, Buergisser Philippe, Klimkait Thomas, Weber Rainer, Hirschel Bernard, Cavassini Matthias, Furrer Hansjakob, Battegay Manuel, Vernazza Pietro L., Bernasconi Enos, Rickenbach Martin, Ledergerber Bruno, Bonhoeffer Sebastian, Guenthard Huldrych F.
ISSN
1537-6613[electronic], 0022-1899[linking]
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Volume
201
Number
10
Pages
1488-1497
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Sequence data from resistance testing offer unique opportunities to characterize the structure of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection epidemics. METHODS: We analyzed a representative set of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B pol sequences from 5700 patients enrolled in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study. We pooled these sequences with the same number of sequences from foreign epidemics, inferred a phylogeny, and identified Swiss transmission clusters as clades having a minimal size of 10 and containing >or=80% Swiss sequences. RESULTS: More than one-half of Swiss patients were included within 60 transmission clusters. Most transmission clusters were significantly dominated by specific transmission routes, which were used to identify the following patient groups: men having sex with men (MSM) (38 transmission clusters; average cluster size, 29 patients) or patients acquiring HIV through heterosexual contact (HETs) and injection drug users (IDUs) (12 transmission clusters; average cluster size, 144 patients). Interestingly, there were no transmission clusters dominated by sequences from HETs only. Although 44% of all HETs who were infected between 1983 and 1986 clustered with injection drug users, this percentage decreased to 18% for 2003-2006 (P<.001), indicating a diminishing role of injection drug users in transmission among HETs over time. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggests (1) the absence of a self-sustaining epidemic of HIV-1 subtype B in HETs in Switzerland and (2) a temporally decreasing clustering of HIV infections in HETs and IDUs.
Keywords
HIV Infections/epidemiology, HIV Infections/transmission, HIV-1/classification, HIV-1/genetics, Heterosexuality, Homosexuality, Male, Humans, Male, Molecular Epidemiology, Phylogeny, Risk Factors, Substance Abuse, Intravenous, Switzerland/epidemiology, Time Factors
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
06/05/2010 13:54
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:08
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