Can Extra Daytime Light Exposure Improve Well-Being and Sleep? A Pilot Study of Patients With Glaucoma.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3B05E2B3C0A3
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Can Extra Daytime Light Exposure Improve Well-Being and Sleep? A Pilot Study of Patients With Glaucoma.
Journal
Frontiers in neurology
Author(s)
Kawasaki A., Udry M., El Wardani M., Münch M.
ISSN
1664-2295 (Print)
ISSN-L
1664-2295
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
11
Pages
584479
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Glaucoma damages retinal ganglion cells, including intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). These cells modulate various non-visual physiological and psychological functions which are modulated by light. In patients with glaucoma, we assessed the effect of daily bright light exposure (LE) on several melanopsin-dependent functions, such as the pupil constriction, circadian rest-activity cycles, sleep and subjective well-being including relaxation, alertness and mood. Twenty patients participated in the study (9 women, 11 men, mean age = 67.6 ± 7.5 y). Pupillometry was performed before the LE weeks and repeated on the last day of LE. The post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) was calculated as a proxy for melanopsin-dependent activation. Participants continuously wore an activity monitor and self-assessed sleep quality, well-being and visual comfort for 7 days before and during 4 weeks of daily bright LE (30 min to 10,000 lux polychromatic bright white light). After the LE, there was a significantly greater PIPR and higher subjective sleep quality when compared to the pre-LE week (p < 0.05), but no significant changes in 24-h rhythms or sleep parameters. A greater PIPR was correlated with an increase in circadian amplitude and higher inter-daily stability (derived from rest-activity cycles; p < 0.05). In a small group of patients with glaucoma, scheduled daily bright light exposure could improve subjective sleep quality. These findings highlight the importance to evaluate and maintain non-visual functions at different levels in patients with progressive loss of ipRGCs.
Keywords
circadian, glaucoma, light therapy, melanopsin, mood, pupil, retinal ganglion cells, sleep
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
08/02/2021 14:52
Last modification date
17/02/2021 7:28
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