Improvement of antibiotic prescription in outpatient care: a cluster-randomized intervention study using a sentinel surveillance network of physicians.

Details

Ressource 1Download: serval:BIB_3AFA3FB99801.P001 (300.27 [Ko])
State: Public
Version: author
License: Not specified
It was possible to publish this article open access thanks to a Swiss National Licence with the publisher.
Serval ID
serval:BIB_3AFA3FB99801
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Improvement of antibiotic prescription in outpatient care: a cluster-randomized intervention study using a sentinel surveillance network of physicians.
Journal
Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Author(s)
Hürlimann D., Limacher A., Schabel M., Zanetti G., Berger C., Mühlemann K., Kronenberg A.
Working group(s)
Swiss Sentinel Working Group
Contributor(s)
Andreoli P., Banderet HR., Béguin P., Birrer A., Dvorak C., Frey P., Gallacchi M., Haller-Hester D., Herzig L., Lehmann T., Merlo Christoph M., Peytremann B., Rohrer J., Rüetschi B., Schnoz M., Senn N., Staehelin A., Stark B., Suter H., Zeller A.
ISSN
1460-2091 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0305-7453
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2015
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
70
Number
2
Pages
602-608
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of implementing guidelines, coupled with individual feedback, on antibiotic prescribing behaviour of primary care physicians in Switzerland.
METHODS: One hundred and forty general practices from a representative Swiss sentinel network of primary care physicians participated in this cluster-randomized prospective intervention study. The intervention consisted of providing guidelines on treatment of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections (UTIs), coupled with sustained, regular feedback on individual antibiotic prescription behaviour during 2 years. The main aims were: (i) to increase the percentage of prescriptions of penicillins for all RTIs treated with antibiotics; (ii) to increase the percentage of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole prescriptions for all uncomplicated lower UTIs treated with antibiotics; (iii) to decrease the percentage of quinolone prescriptions for all cases of exacerbated COPD (eCOPD) treated with antibiotics; and (iv) to decrease the proportion of sinusitis and other upper RTIs treated with antibiotics. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01358916).
RESULTS: While the percentage of antibiotics prescribed for sinusitis or other upper RTIs and the percentage of quinolones prescribed for eCOPD did not differ between the intervention group and the control group, there was a significant increase in the percentage of prescriptions of penicillins for all RTIs treated with antibiotics [57% versus 49%, OR=1.42 (95% CI 1.08-1.89), P=0.01] and in the percentage of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole prescriptions for all uncomplicated lower UTIs treated with antibiotics [35% versus 19%, OR=2.16 (95% CI 1.19-3.91), P=0.01] in the intervention group.
CONCLUSIONS: In our setting, implementing guidelines, coupled with sustained individual feedback, was not able to reduce the proportion of sinusitis and other upper RTIs treated with antibiotics, but increased the use of recommended antibiotics for RTIs and UTIs, as defined by the guidelines.
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
26/01/2015 13:48
Last modification date
25/09/2019 6:08
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