Impact of the reduction of the recommended energy target in the ICU on protein delivery and clinical outcomes.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3A9DEB354767
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Impact of the reduction of the recommended energy target in the ICU on protein delivery and clinical outcomes.
Journal
Clinical nutrition
Author(s)
Berger M.M., Soguel L., Charrière M., Thériault B., Pralong F., Schaller M.D.
ISSN
1532-1983 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0261-5614
Publication state
Published
Issued date
02/2017
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
36
Number
1
Pages
281-287
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Observational Study ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Energy targets are a matter of debate for intensive care (ICU) patients. As the guidelines have evolved, energy targets have been reduced, while the protein intake objectives have increased. The impact of these changes remains largely unknown. This quality study aimed at investigating the clinical impact of these changes in patients with an ICU stay >3 days.
Observational cohort study over two 3 months periods (A, B), with distinct prevailing nutrition recommendations in patients admitted consecutively to a multidisciplinary ICU. Inclusion criterion: ICU stay >3 days. Recorded variables: severity scores, energy target and delivery, protein delivery, feeding route, length of stay (ICU, hospital) and hospital outcome. Data as mean, SD and IQR.
The analysis included 389 patients, and 3920 observation days. Except for patient age (A versus B: 57.8 and 62.3 years; p = 0.010) and NRS (4.3 vs 3.9 respectively p = 0.002), the cohorts were similar. Compared to A, the mean prescribed energy target decreased by 125 kcal (1947 kcal/d vs. 1822 kcal*day javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@4c77491f respectively), resulting in lower energy delivery (1353 kcal*day javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@5b073796 vs. 1238 kcal*day javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@799d43b5 ; p < 0.0001), and reduced protein delivery (81 g*day javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@15dbf2ab vs. 65 g*day javax.xml.bind.JAXBElement@63927ebe : p < 0.0001). These differences were associated in survivors with prolonged mechanical ventilation (5.0 days vs. 6.7 days; p = 0.004), extended ICU stay (8.5 vs. 9.9 days; p = 0.0036), and longer hospital stay (23.4 vs. 26.4 days respectively; p = 0.028). Mortality was unchanged.
A linear reduction in energy target recommendation without changing the feed composition led to an unplanned and significant reduction in protein delivery, which was associated with a prolonged duration of ventilation and an extended hospital stay.

Keywords
Adult, Aged, Cohort Studies, Critical Illness/therapy, Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage, Female, Humans, Intensive Care Units, Length of Stay, Male, Middle Aged, Nutrition Policy, Nutritional Requirements, Nutritional Status, Recommended Dietary Allowances, Respiration, Artificial, Treatment Outcome, Critical care, Malnutrition, Monitoring, Outcome, Protein requirements
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
11/10/2016 15:29
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:30
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