Study of a seventeenth-century French artificial mummy: autopsical, native, and contrast-injected CT investigations.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_39BC8D7E91EB
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Publication sub-type
Case report (case report): feedback on an observation with a short commentary.
Collection
Publications
Title
Study of a seventeenth-century French artificial mummy: autopsical, native, and contrast-injected CT investigations.
Journal
International journal of legal medicine
Author(s)
Colleter R., Dedouit F., Duchesne S., Gérard P., Dercle L., Poilpré P., Gendrot V., Rousseau H., Crubézy É., Telmon N., Mokrane F.Z.
ISSN
1437-1596 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0937-9827
Publication state
Published
Issued date
09/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
132
Number
5
Pages
1405-1413
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Historical Article ; Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
A lead coffin was fortuitously discovered in a church called "Eglise des Toussaints" in Rennes (French Brittany). A collaborative taskforce investigated this extraordinary discovery. A multi-disciplinary team of experts from the National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research (INRAP) and Rangueil University Hospital of Toulouse was created, including anthropologists, archeologists, forensic pathologists, radiologists, and pathologists. The inscription on the lead coffin specified that the body belonged to "Messer Louys de Bruslon, Lord of Plessis," a nobleman who died on November 1, 1661. Multiple holes were visible in the lead coffin, and deterioration threatened the mummy. We opened the lead coffin and discovered an excellently preserved mummy, except for mostly skeletonized upper and lower limbs. The mummy was conserved in several layers of shrouds. Vegetal embalming material covered the head and filled the face, the thorax, and the abdomen. The embalmers had removed all thoracic and abdominal organs and conserved some pelvic organs (e.g., the bladder).
Multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner evaluated the mummy, at each step of our analysis. The excellent preservation of abdominal vascular axes led us to perform a CT angiography using Angiofil®, an oily contrast agent developed for postmortem imaging, before an autopsy.
Sub-diaphragmatic arteries, including the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, were excellently preserved. The vascular contrast agent filled all arteries. The native CT, CT angiography, and autopsy did not detect any vascular lesion.
Our study, based on rare archeological material, allowed a complete examination of an excellently preserved seventeenth-century mummy, using MSCT, angiography, and an autopsy. We did not detect any arterial lesion and proposed a comprehensive description of the embalmment process.
Keywords
Angiography, Artifacts, Autopsy/methods, Contrast Media, Embalming/history, History, 17th Century, Humans, Mummies/history, Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods, Brittany, Embalming, Modern era, Multi-slice computed tomography, Mummy, Postmortem
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
06/04/2018 16:04
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:29
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