Risque accru de colonisation bacterienne des catheters intraveineux recouverts de pansements transparents adhesifs en polyurethane, compare aux pansements classiques en gaze. [Increased risk of bacterial colonization of intravenous catheters covered with transparent adhesive polyurethane bandages, compared to classical gauze bandages]

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_38FB3ECE8C86
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Risque accru de colonisation bacterienne des catheters intraveineux recouverts de pansements transparents adhesifs en polyurethane, compare aux pansements classiques en gaze. [Increased risk of bacterial colonization of intravenous catheters covered with transparent adhesive polyurethane bandages, compared to classical gauze bandages]
Journal
Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift
Author(s)
Meylan  P. R.
ISSN
0036-7672 (Print)
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/1987
Volume
117
Number
50
Pages
2013-6
Notes
Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial --- Old month value: Dec 12
Abstract
While transparent polyurethane dressings are increasingly used for the care of intravenous catheters, concern has recently been expressed regarding their microbiological safety. We have therefore compared the rate of intravenous catheter bacterial colonization after randomly assigning intensive care patients to transparent polyurethane (n = 21) or dry gauze (n = 20) dressings. Polyvinyl chloride catheters were inserted and maintained by the nurses. No antiseptic or antibiotic ointment was used. The two groups of patients were similar regarding risk factors for catheter colonization. Colonization rate was 48% (10/21) among patients with transparent dressings versus 10% (2/20) among patients with dry gauze dressings (p = 0.008). Colonizing bacterial species were Staphylococcus epidermidis (11 strains) and S. aureus (1 strain). No catheter-related bacteremia was observed. These data suggest that the colonization rate of intravenous catheters is increased by the use of polyurethane dressings, possibly increasing the risk of septic phlebitis and bacteremia.
Keywords
Adult Aged *Bacteriological Techniques *Bandages Catheterization, Peripheral/*adverse effects Humans Middle Aged Polyurethanes Risk Factors Staphylococcus/*isolation & purification Textiles
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
25/01/2008 14:33
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:28
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