A quasi-randomized group trial of a brief alcohol intervention on risky single occasion drinking among secondary school students.

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Version: Final published version
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_380AA5A393A9
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
A quasi-randomized group trial of a brief alcohol intervention on risky single occasion drinking among secondary school students.
Journal
International Journal of Public Health
Author(s)
Gmel G., Venzin V., Marmet K., Danko G., Labhart F.
ISSN
1661-8564 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1661-8556
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2012
Volume
57
Number
6
Pages
935-944
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To show the effectiveness of a brief group alcohol intervention. Aims of the intervention were to reduce the frequency of heavy drinking occasions, maximum number of drinks on an occasion and overall weekly consumption.
METHODS: A cluster quasi-randomized control trial (intervention n = 338; control n = 330) among 16- to 18-year-old secondary school students in the Swiss Canton of Zürich. Groups homogeneous for heavy drinking occasions (5+/4+ drinks for men/women) consisted of those having medium risk (3-4) or high risk (5+) occasions in the past 30 days. Groups of 8-10 individuals received two 45-min sessions based on motivational interviewing techniques.
RESULTS: Borderline significant beneficial effects (p < 0.10) on heavy drinking occasions and alcohol volume were found 6 months later for the medium-risk group only, but not for the high-risk group. None of the effects remained significant after Bonferroni corrections.
CONCLUSIONS: Group intervention was ineffective for all at-risk users. The heaviest drinkers may need more intensive treatment. Alternative explanations were iatrogenic effects among the heaviest drinkers, assessment reactivity, or reduction of social desirability bias at follow-up through peer feedback.
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13/02/2013 10:02
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09/07/2021 5:37
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