Investigating prenatal perceived support as protective factor against adverse birth outcomes: a community cohort study.

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Version: Author's accepted manuscript
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Serval ID
serval:BIB_38072F2E463F
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Investigating prenatal perceived support as protective factor against adverse birth outcomes: a community cohort study.
Journal
Journal of reproductive and infant psychology
Author(s)
Duroux M., Stuijfzand S., Sandoz V., Horsch A.
ISSN
1469-672X (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0264-6838
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Pages
1-12
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
Studies show that prenatal maternal anxiety may act as a risk factor for adverse birth outcomes, whilst prenatal social support may rather act as a protective factor. However, studies examining prenatal anxiety symptoms, prenatal perceived support, and neonatal and/or obstetric outcomes are lacking.
This study investigated whether, in a community sample, prenatal perceived support: (1) had a protective influence on birth outcomes (gestational age (GA), birthweight (BW), 5-minute Apgar score, and mode of delivery); (2) acted as a protective factor, moderating the relationship between anxiety symptoms and the aforementioned birth outcomes.
During their third trimester of pregnancy, 182 nulliparous child-bearers completed standardized questionnaires of anxiety (HADS-A) and perceived support (MOS-SSS). Birth outcomes data was extracted from medical records.
(1) Perceived support did not significantly predict any birth outcomes. However, perceived tangible support - MOS-SSS subscale assessing perceived material/financial aid - significantly positively predicted the 5-minute Apgar score. (2) Perceived support did not significantly moderate the relationship between anxiety symptoms and birth outcomes. However, perceived tangible support significantly moderated the relationship between anxiety symptoms and the 5-minute Apgar score.
When experienced within non-clinical thresholds, prenatal anxiety symptoms do not increase the risk of adverse neonatal and obstetric outcomes when perceived support is present.
Keywords
Birth outcomes, maternal mental health, pregnancy, prenatal anxiety, social support
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
15/10/2021 9:04
Last modification date
23/10/2021 5:38
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