Targeting Angiogenesis in Glioma - Challenges and Pitfalls

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_36BDD10DB3DE
Type
Inproceedings: an article in a conference proceedings.
Publication sub-type
Abstract (Abstract): shot summary in a article that contain essentials elements presented during a scientific conference, lecture or from a poster.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Targeting Angiogenesis in Glioma - Challenges and Pitfalls
Title of the conference
European Multidisciplinary Cancer Congress on Integrating Basic and Translational Science, Surgery, Radiotherapy, Medical oncology, Advocacy and Care
Author(s)
Stupp R., Tabatabai G., Weller M., Ruegg C.
Address
Stockholm, Sweden, September 23-27, 2011
ISBN
0959-8049
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2011
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
47
Series
European Journal of Cancer
Pages
S64
Language
english
Notes
Publication type : Meeting Abstract
Abstract
Malignant gliomas, notably glioblastoma are among the most vascularized and angiogenic cancers, and microvascular proliferation is one of the hallmarks for the diagnosis of glioblastoma. Angiogenesis is regulated by a balance of pro- and antiangiogenic signals; overexpression of VEGF and activation of its receptors, most notable VEGFR-2 and -3, results in endothelial cell proliferation and leaky vasculature. Heterogeneous perfusion and oxygenation, peritumoral edema and increased interstitial pressure are the consequence. Both endothelial and tumour cells are strongly dependent on integrin-mediated adhesion for cell proliferation, survival, migration and invasion.Strategies aiming at inhibition of cell signaling and angiogenesis, including integrin inhibitors, have been clinically investigated in gliomas over the last 5 years. Radiological responses, a decreased requirement of corticosteroids and temporary improvement in performance status have repeatedly been observed. Toxicity was mild-moderate and manageable, notably there was no evidence for a substantially increased incidence of intracranial bleeding. However definitive comparative (randomized !) investigation has failed to demonstrate improved outcome with singleagent inhibition of EGFR, or PDGFR or VEGF/VEGFRs pathways in recurrent glioblastoma. Definitive phase III trials combining the anti- VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, or cilengitide, a peptidic integrininhibitor, together with temozolomide and radiotherapy are ongoing (accrual completed).The integration of anti-angiogenic strategies in the management of malignant glioma also poses entirely new challenges in patient management: 1) Many agents are known for increasing the risk of thrombosis, embolism and intracranial bleeding. 2) Evaluation of treatment efficacy is difficult and new biomarkers of activity, including functional, metabolic or molecular imaging techniques are urgently needed. Normalization of vasculature leads to decrease in contrast enhancement without necessarily reflecting tumour shrinkage. Tumour heterogeneity, putative prognostic or predictive factors require early controlled trials, novel trial designs and endpoints.3) Activation of alternate pathways and tumour escape mechanisms may require combination of multiple agents, which is often not feasible due to regulatory restrictions and potential complex toxicities. Emerging clinical and experimental evidence suggests that anti-angiogenic drugs might need to be combined with drugs targeting tumour adaptive mechanisms in addition to cytotoxic chemotherapy and irradiation for a maximal antitumour effect.
Keywords
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Web of science
Create date
10/11/2011 9:11
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:24
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