Is Recovery Optimized by Using a Cycle Ergometer Between Ski-Mountaineering Sprints?

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3643A4FF0D54
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Is Recovery Optimized by Using a Cycle Ergometer Between Ski-Mountaineering Sprints?
Journal
International journal of sports physiology and performance
Author(s)
Krumm B., Luisier F., Rapillard A., Faiss R.
ISSN
1555-0273 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1555-0265
Publication state
Published
Issued date
01/05/2023
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
18
Number
5
Pages
553-556
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Randomized Controlled Trial
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
To optimize the recovery phase between heats in ski-mountaineering sprint competitions, this study investigated whether an active recovery protocol on an ergocycle could improve subsequent performance compared with a self-selected recovery strategy.
Thirteen elite ski mountaineers (9 men and 4 women) performed 3 sprints with 2 different recovery conditions (Ergo vs Free) in a randomized order. The Ergo condition involved a 10-minute constant-intensity exercise on an ergocycle performed at 70% of maximum heart rate. For the Free condition, the athlete was asked to self-select modality. At the end of the third sprint, a passive recovery (seated) was prescribed for both protocols. Sprint performance (time) and physiological parameters (lactate concentration [La], heart rate [HR], and rating of perceived exertion [RPE]) were recorded from each sprint and recovery phase.
In the Ergo vs Free protocols, sprint times (177 [24] s vs 176 [23] s; P = .63), recovery average HR (70% [2.9%] vs 71% [5.2%] of maximal HR), and RPE (16.7 [1.5] vs 16.8 [1.5]; P = .81) were not significantly different. However, [La] decreased more after Ergo (-2.9 [1.8] mmol·L-1) and Free (-2.8 [1.8] mmol·L-1) conditions compared with passive recovery (-1.1 [1.6] mmol·L-1; P < .05).
The use of an ergocycle between heat sprints in ski mountaineering does not provide additional benefits compared with a recovery strategy freely chosen by the athletes. However, active conditions provide a faster [La] reduction compared with passive recovery and seem to be a more suitable strategy between multiple-heat sprints.
Keywords
Female, Humans, Male, Ergometry, Exercise/physiology, Heart Rate/physiology, Lactic Acid, Mountaineering, elite athletes, sprint recovery
Pubmed
Web of science
Create date
06/04/2023 12:18
Last modification date
14/12/2023 7:11
Usage data