Visuo-motor and interoceptive influences on peripersonal space representation following spinal cord injury.

Details

Ressource 1Request a copy Sous embargo indéterminé.
State: Public
Version: author
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_35CB2A0A409B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Visuo-motor and interoceptive influences on peripersonal space representation following spinal cord injury.
Journal
Scientific reports
Author(s)
Scandola M., Aglioti S.M., Lazzeri G., Avesani R., Ionta S., Moro V.
ISSN
2045-2322 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-2322
Publication state
Published
Issued date
20/03/2020
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
10
Number
1
Pages
5162
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: epublish
Abstract
Peripersonal space (PPS) representation is modulated by information coming from the body. In paraplegic individuals, whose lower limb sensory-motor functions are impaired or completely lost, the representation of PPS around the feet is reduced. However, passive motion can have short-term restorative effects. What remains unclear is the mechanisms underlying this recovery, in particular with regard to the contribution of visual and motor feedback and of interoception. Using virtual reality technology, we dissociated the motor and visual feedback during passive motion in paraplegics with complete and incomplete lesions and in healthy controls. The results show that in the case of paraplegics, the presence of motor feedback was necessary for the recovery of PPS representation, both when the motor feedback was congruent and when it was incongruent with the visual feedback. In contrast, visuo-motor incongruence led to an inhibition of PPS representation in the control group. There were no differences in sympathetic responses between the three groups. Nevertheless, in individuals with incomplete lesions, greater interoceptive sensitivity was associated with a better representation of PPS around the feet in the visuo-motor incongruent conditions. These results shed new light on the modulation of PPS representation, and demonstrate the importance of residual motor feedback and its integration with other bodily information in maintaining space representation.
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
01/04/2020 20:53
Last modification date
26/01/2021 7:26
Usage data