How do Swiss general practitioners agree with and report adhering to a top-five list of unnecessary tests and treatments? Results of a cross-sectional survey.

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State: Public
Version: Final published version
Serval ID
serval:BIB_34B34223464B
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
How do Swiss general practitioners agree with and report adhering to a top-five list of unnecessary tests and treatments? Results of a cross-sectional survey.
Journal
The European journal of general practice
Author(s)
Selby K., Cornuz J., Cohidon C., Gaspoz J.M., Senn N.
ISSN
1751-1402 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
1381-4788
Publication state
Published
Issued date
12/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
24
Number
1
Pages
32-38
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
In 2014, the 'Smarter Medicine' campaign released a top five list of unnecessary tests and treatments in Swiss primary care, such as imaging for acute low-back pain and long-term prescribing of proton pump inhibitors.
Measure general practitioners' (GPs) agreement with the recommendations and self-reported adherence.
Cross-sectional, online survey of GPs in the 'Swiss primary care active monitoring' (SPAM) network, which assessed awareness of 'Smarter Medicine' and views on each recommendation. Questions included whether the clinical situation is common, whether the recommendation is followed, whether GPs agree with the recommendation and reasons why the recommendation would not be followed.
One-hundred-and-sixty-seven of 277 GPs from the SPAM network participated (60%), of which 104 (62%) knew of 'Smarter Medicine', including 79% in German areas, 49% in French areas and 38% in Italian areas (P < 0.001). Agreement with the five recommendations was high, with scores around nine out of 10. The proportion saying they typically follow each recommendation was 68 to 74%, except not continuing long-term PPI prescriptions without attempting dose reduction, with only 34%. Common reasons for not following the recommendations were patient or other provider requests and situations that might suggest the need for more aggressive care.
Two years after the launch of the campaign, awareness and acceptance of 'Smarter Medicine' appear to be high among Swiss GPs. By self-report, the recommendations are adhered to by most of the respondents but there may be room for improvement, especially for long-term PPI prescriptions.

Keywords
Clinical decision-making, general practice, medical overuse, proton pump inhibitors, rational use of medications
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
11/01/2018 16:29
Last modification date
20/08/2019 14:21
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