Dreaming in NREM Sleep: A High-Density EEG Study of Slow Waves and Spindles.

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Version: Final published version
License: CC BY 4.0
Serval ID
serval:BIB_33F804809ACD
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Dreaming in NREM Sleep: A High-Density EEG Study of Slow Waves and Spindles.
Journal
The Journal of neuroscience
Author(s)
Siclari F., Bernardi G., Cataldi J., Tononi G.
ISSN
1529-2401 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
0270-6474
Publication state
Published
Issued date
24/10/2018
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
38
Number
43
Pages
9175-9185
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article ; Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural ; Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Publication Status: ppublish
Abstract
Dreaming can occur in both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-REM (NREM) sleep. We recently showed that in both REM and NREM sleep, dreaming is associated with local decreases in slow wave activity (SWA) in posterior brain regions. To expand these findings, here we asked how specific features of slow waves and spindles, the hallmarks of NREM sleep, relate to dream experiences. Fourteen healthy human subjects (10 females) underwent nocturnal high-density EEG recordings combined with a serial awakening paradigm. Reports of dreaming, compared with reports of no experience, were preceded by fewer, smaller, and shallower slow waves, and faster spindles, especially in central and posterior cortical areas. We also identified a minority of very steep and large slow waves in frontal regions, which occurred on a background of reduced SWA and were associated with high-frequency power increases (local "microarousals") heralding the successful recall of dream content. These results suggest that the capacity of the brain to generate experiences during sleep is reduced in the presence of neuronal off-states in posterior and central brain regions, and that dream recall may be facilitated by the intermittent activation of arousal systems during NREM sleep.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT By combining high-density EEG recordings with a serial awakening paradigm in healthy subjects, we show that dreaming in non-rapid eye movement sleep occurs when slow waves in central and posterior regions are sparse, small, and shallow. We also identified a small subset of very large and steep frontal slow waves that are associated with high-frequency activity increases (local "microarousals") heralding successful recall of dream content. These results provide noninvasive measures that could represent a useful tool to infer the state of consciousness during sleep.
Keywords
Adult, Dreams/physiology, Electroencephalography/trends, Female, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Polysomnography/trends, Sleep Stages/physiology, Sleep, Slow-Wave/physiology, Young Adult, consciousness, dream, high-density EEG, sleep, slow wave
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
19/09/2018 11:04
Last modification date
14/10/2019 6:09
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