Secondhand smoke and health-related quality of life in never smokers: results from the SAPALDIA Cohort Study 2

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_3328964FD92A
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Secondhand smoke and health-related quality of life in never smokers: results from the SAPALDIA Cohort Study 2
Journal
Annals of Internal Medicine
Author(s)
Bridevaux Pierre-Olivier, Cornuz Jacques, Gaspoz Jean-Michel, Burnand Bernard, Ackermann-Liebrich Ursula, Schindler Christian, Leuenberger Philippe, Rochat Thierry, Gerbase Margaret W., SAPALDIA Team
ISSN
0003-4819
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2007
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
167
Number
22
Pages
2516-2523
Language
english
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Although secondhand smoke (SHS) has been linked with various respiratory conditions and symptoms, its association with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is unknown. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed of 2500 never smokers in Switzerland who participated in the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung Diseases in Adults and completed a 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) in 2002. Using linear regression models adjusting for confounders, we measured the association between HRQOL and moderate or high SHS exposure (</=3 h/d or >3 h/d) compared with no SHS exposure. Data from men and women were analyzed separately and further stratified by source of SHS (home, workplace, and public spaces). RESULTS: After adjustments, SHS was associated with reduced scores in all SF-36 domains. High SHS exposure predicted a greater reduction in HRQOL. Compared with nonexposed women, those with high SHS exposure at home had significantly lower scores on the physical functioning (-7.8, P < .001), role physical (-10.5, P = .02), bodily pain (-9.2, P = .01), and social functioning (-8.1, P = .007) domains. Exposed men had lower scores for the role physical domain (-20.0, P < .001) and a trend toward lower scores in other domains. In women, exposure to SHS at home was associated with a stronger negative effect on HRQOL than at work and in public spaces. CONCLUSIONS: Secondhand smoke is associated with reduced HRQOL, more significantly so in women. Exposure to SHS at home and high levels of exposure are associated with lower SF-36 scores, suggesting a dose-response relationship.
Keywords
Health Status , Quality of Life , Smoking , Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Pubmed
Web of science
Open Access
Yes
Create date
05/02/2008 12:22
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:19
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