Healthcare trajectories and costs in the last year of life: a retrospective primary care and hospital analysis.

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_32F3C56C5921
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Institution
Title
Healthcare trajectories and costs in the last year of life: a retrospective primary care and hospital analysis.
Journal
BMJ supportive & palliative care
Author(s)
Luta X., Diernberger K., Bowden J., Droney J., Howdon D., Schmidlin K., Rodwin V., Hall P., Marti J.
ISSN
2045-4368 (Electronic)
ISSN-L
2045-435X
Publication state
In Press
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Language
english
Notes
Publication types: Journal Article
Publication Status: aheadofprint
Abstract
To analyse healthcare utilisation and costs in the last year of life in England, and to study variation by cause of death, region of patient residence and socioeconomic status.
This is a retrospective cohort study. Individuals aged 60 years and over (N=108 510) who died in England between 2010 and 2017 were included in the study.
Healthcare utilisation and costs in the last year of life increased with proximity to death, particularly in the last month of life. The mean total costs were higher among males (£8089) compared with females (£6898) and declined with age at death (£9164 at age 60-69 to £5228 at age 90+) with inpatient care accounting for over 60% of total costs. Costs decline with age at death (0.92, 95% CI 0.88 to 0.95, p<0.0001 for age group 90+ compared with to the reference category age group 60-69) and were lower among females (0.91, 95% CI 0.90 to 0.92, p<0.0001 compared with males). Costs were higher (1.09, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.14, p<0.0001) in London compared with other regions.
Healthcare utilisation and costs in the last year of life increase with proximity to death, particularly in the last month of life. Finer geographical data and information on healthcare supply would allow further investigating whether people receiving more planned care by primary care and or specialist palliative care towards the end of life require less acute care.
Keywords
end of life care
Pubmed
Open Access
Yes
Create date
21/12/2020 15:25
Last modification date
28/10/2021 5:45
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