Prevalence and associated factors for Chlamydia trachomatis infection among undocumented immigrants in a primary care facility in Geneva, Switzerland: a cross-sectional study

Details

Serval ID
serval:BIB_32D4219475FB
Type
Article: article from journal or magazin.
Collection
Publications
Title
Prevalence and associated factors for Chlamydia trachomatis infection among undocumented immigrants in a primary care facility in Geneva, Switzerland: a cross-sectional study
Journal
Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health / Center for Minority Public Health
Author(s)
Jackson Yves, Sebo Paul, Aeby Gaëlle, Bovier Patrick, Ninet Beatrice, Schrenzel Jacques, Sudre Philippe, Haller Dagmar, Gaspoz Jean-Michel, Wolff Hans
ISSN-L
1557-1920
Publication state
Published
Issued date
2010
Peer-reviewed
Oui
Volume
12
Number
6
Pages
909-914
Language
english
Notes
PMID: 20490682
Abstract
Chlamydia trachomatis infection (CTI) is the most frequent sexually transmitted infection in western countries. Its prevalence in undocumented immigrants, a rapidly growing vulnerable population, remains unknown. We aimed to document the prevalence of CTI and associated factors at the primary health care level. This cross-sectional study included all undocumented immigrants attending a health care facility in Geneva, Switzerland. Participants completed a questionnaire and were tested for CTI by PCR assay. Three-hundred thirteen undocumented immigrants (68.4% female, mean age 32.4 (SD 8) years) agreed to participate. CTI prevalence was 5.8% (95% CI 3.3-8.4). Factors associated with higher prevalence were age â0/00¤25 (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.3-12.2) and having had two or more sexual partners during the precedent year (OR 4.5, 95% CI 1.5-13.7). Prevalence and associated factors for infection in this vulnerable population were comparable with other populations in Western countries. Our findings support the importance of facilitating access to existing screening opportunities in particular to individuals at higher risk.
Keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Chlamydia Infections, Chlamydia trachomatis, Cross-Sectional Studies, Emigrants and Immigrants, Female, Hospitals, University, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Primary Health Care, Switzerland, Young Adult
Create date
20/03/2012 13:26
Last modification date
20/08/2019 13:18
Usage data